Alberto Moravia – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 12:16:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://i-racconti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Alberto Moravia – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ 32 32 Joyce P. Barrett, 93 – Page 1 Publications https://i-racconti.com/joyce-p-barrett-93-page-1-publications/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 15:00:04 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/joyce-p-barrett-93-page-1-publications/ Joyce P. Barrett, 93, of East Grand Forks, MN, passed away on November 21, 2021 at Valley Senior Living / Woodside Village with her family by her side.Joyce Patricia (Aardahl) Barrett was born on April 5, 1928 in Whitman, North Dakota to Peter and Julia (Aarhus) Aardahl. She was baptized at Sarnia Lutheran Church in […]]]>

Joyce P. Barrett, 93, of East Grand Forks, MN, passed away on November 21, 2021 at Valley Senior Living / Woodside Village with her family by her side.
Joyce Patricia (Aardahl) Barrett was born on April 5, 1928 in Whitman, North Dakota to Peter and Julia (Aarhus) Aardahl. She was baptized at Sarnia Lutheran Church in Whitman, North Dakota. The family moved to Larimore, North Dakota, where Joyce was confirmed to Our Savior Lutheran Church. Joyce attended school and was active in the band, choir, and sang in a competitive trio group. She graduated from Larimore High School and has remained a proud alumnus, returning for class reunions, family visits, and Larimore Days. She attended Aaker’s Business College in Grand Forks, North Dakota and worked as a legal secretary for the law firm Matt. During this time, she was introduced to the love of her life, Richard “Dick” Barrett, a handsome strong farmer from East Grand Forks. They married in 1951 at his native church in Larimore and became life members of the United Lutheran Church in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Joyce was active in the church and supported all local missionary work. She loved spending time with the Sons of Norway to celebrate her Norwegian heritage.

Joyce was proud of the Barrett Family Farm as she worked alongside Richard for many years. Together, they raised their six children on their family farm in rural East Grand Forks. She loved going to church, school, and sporting activities for her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Joyce had a deep love for her country and the men and women of military service, having seen her older brothers Clay, Leslie, and Maynard depart to serve in World War II and have her son, David, serve in the United States Navy, as well. than many other veterans. relatives and friends.
Joyce is survived by her children: Paul (Marilyn) Barrett of East Grand Forks, MN, David (Karen) Barrett of Sammamish, WA, John (Janice) Barrett of East Grand Forks, MN, Carolyn (Carlos) Resendez of San Antonio, TX, Glenn (Cindy) Barrett of Warren, MN, and Sandra (Paul) Burda of Thief River Falls, MN; 18 grandchildren: Josh (Stephanie) Barrett, Sarah (Aaron) Gustafson, Elizabeth Barrett, Katie (Lucas) Holzhueter, Jeffrey Hanson, Rebecah (Matthew) Boeckman, Anna (Jared) Bryl, Timothy Barrett, Erin Barrett, Andrew (Stacia) ) Barrett, Monica (Robert) Nalbach, Emily Barrett, Elissa Resendez, Gabriel Resendez, Marisa (Alberto) Moravia, Garrett Corlis, McKenna (David) Cosottile and Breanne (Chris) Recore; 16 great-grandchildren: Alexandra, Ronin, Blakely, Bristol, Briar, Jordan, Nora, Vada, Croix, Natalie, Henry, Isaac, Jackson, Clara and Luca; sister-in-law Marie “Toots” Barrett of East Grand Forks, MN, and several nieces, nephews, friends and family who will be mourned after her passing.

Joyce was predeceased by her husband, parents, sister Margaret Brandon and brothers Norman, Henry, Leslie, Clay and Maynard Aardahl.
Special thanks to all the staff at Woodside Village for their care and support.

Funeral Service: Tuesday, November 30, 2021 at 11:00 am, at the United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., Grand Forks, ND 58201. The funeral will be webcast live on Joyce’s page at www.dandahlfuneralhome.com

Visits: 1 hour before church services.

Interment: Nisbet Cemetery, rural East Grand Forks, MN.

Online guestbook: www.dandahlfuneralhome.com

Arrangements by: Dahl Funeral Home ~ East Grand Forks, MN


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“El Chuncho”, the crazy game against the backdrop of the Mexican revolution https://i-racconti.com/el-chuncho-the-crazy-game-against-the-backdrop-of-the-mexican-revolution/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 10:40:13 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/el-chuncho-the-crazy-game-against-the-backdrop-of-the-mexican-revolution/ “El Chuncho” (Sorted 1967) by Damiano Damiani. Carlotta movies Chanshu It represents an important date in the history of Italian cinema. The 1967 film Damiano Damiani opened a series of Western films depicting the Mexican Revolution as an allegory of struggles against imperialism in the Third World. Beyond that, it illustrates a unique way, typical […]]]>

Chanshu It represents an important date in the history of Italian cinema. The 1967 film Damiano Damiani opened a series of Western films depicting the Mexican Revolution as an allegory of struggles against imperialism in the Third World. Beyond that, it illustrates a unique way, typical of the best cross-alpine production of today, of willingly mixing spectacle and reflection, a somewhat frivolous lyricism and an abstract dialectical vision.

Originally there is a small production company from Emilia Romagna, MCM directed by Bianco Mannini, screenplay by Salvatore Lurani and directed by Damiano Damiani, to date author mainly of “literary adaptations for cinema” (Taboo Island According to Elsa Morante, Boredom and transformative eroticism After Alberto Moravia). Damiani entrusts the screenplay to Franco Solinas who, with the help of the director, will give it its final version, imposing on the story a political dimension that is not excluded from the echo of contemporary history.

A Mexican thief (Gian Maria Volonte) who supplies stolen weapons to a legendary revolutionary leader accepts a young American (Le Castel) with mysterious origins into his gang. The alien, without understanding the real purpose of the alien, befriends a hitman in the service of the established government. Franco Solinas, who started his career in the early 1950s, had just signed a screenplay Battle of Algeria By Luigi Pontecorvo and Especially in the West by Sergio SolimaColorado, which contained in germ the principle of the story on which the screenwriter was going, for several years, to play many variations.

Read also Honorable mention: Sergio Leone, In Search of the Lost Cinema

A metaphorical view of imperialism

Two men of different origins, one Western, the other poor citizen of the Third World victim of colonialism, compete, confront each other, and end up allying themselves or remaining enemies, prisoners of their class belonging. and their individual influence. This pattern will later be repeated in other titles of Solinas’s text: Western Zapatistas (mercenaries by Sergio Corbucci, Three to slaughter by Giulio Petroni) or Forward Educational Historical Film (burnt by Jello Pontecorvo). All these titles, however openly commercial, would offer an allegorical vision of imperialism while questioning, even shaking, the spectator’s ability to identify with the characters who are irreducible in their unique psychological construction.

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The best films that will turn 50 in 2021 https://i-racconti.com/the-best-films-that-will-turn-50-in-2021/ https://i-racconti.com/the-best-films-that-will-turn-50-in-2021/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 17:08:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-best-films-that-will-turn-50-in-2021/ While the accusations against Woody Allen haven’t completely spoiled the experience of watching his films for you, there is still joy to be found in his work. When aliens in “Stardust Memories” from the 1980s tell Woody Allen “We love your movies, especially the funny movies of the year,” Allen mocked himself and referred to […]]]>

While the accusations against Woody Allen haven’t completely spoiled the experience of watching his films for you, there is still joy to be found in his work. When aliens in “Stardust Memories” from the 1980s tell Woody Allen “We love your movies, especially the funny movies of the year,” Allen mocked himself and referred to stormy images like his third directorial effort, “Bananas,” in which he naturally also wrote and play.

In the trailer and in his own words, he describes his role and the fruity plot: “I play the part of Fielding Mellish, who is a product tester at a small company in New York, who through the turn of events finds himself leader of a Latin American country. ”Indeed, Allen as Mellish gets in the way of pursuing an activist girl (Louise Lasser, who had divorced Allen in real life a year before) and ends up by donning revolutionary fatigues and a long beard similar to Castro’s. He was shot, harassed by the press and the public, and even had to go to court, where he objected: “This trial is a parody . mockery of a sham. “

“Bananas” was in part based on the book “Don Quixote, USA” by Richard Powell, had a score by Marvin Hamlisch and Yomo Toro, starred Sylvester Stallone in an uncredited leading role as Subway Thug No. 1, and marked the first of two collaborations with acclaimed sports announcer Howard Cosell. Orange, are you glad you saw “Bananas”?


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GUEST COLUMN: Books in the Sarnia Library Helped Me Adjust to a New Life https://i-racconti.com/guest-column-books-in-the-sarnia-library-helped-me-adjust-to-a-new-life/ https://i-racconti.com/guest-column-books-in-the-sarnia-library-helped-me-adjust-to-a-new-life/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 05:11:21 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/guest-column-books-in-the-sarnia-library-helped-me-adjust-to-a-new-life/ Delia De Santis Growing up in Italy, we didn’t have any books except a prayer book. Delia De Santis Sometimes my mother would borrow a book from school and read to us. But we couldn’t keep it for more than a week and couldn’t always hear the end. My father immigrated to Canada in 1954 […]]]>

Delia De Santis

Growing up in Italy, we didn’t have any books except a prayer book.

Delia De Santis

Sometimes my mother would borrow a book from school and read to us. But we couldn’t keep it for more than a week and couldn’t always hear the end.

My father immigrated to Canada in 1954 and my mother, brother and I followed two years later. I was 13 and when I found out I could borrow free books from the public library two blocks away, I was elated.

I started taking out loads at times. I didn’t know English and actually learned the meaning of words before I could pronounce them. When I found an Italian-sounding word (derived from Latin), I discovered the rest of the sentence.

My older brother had studied English in Italy and quickly began to speak fluently. One day he bought a book called The woman of Rome. Thinking this would be a juicy story about a prostitute, I asked her if I could read it. “It doesn’t matter,” he said, and walked to his room.

One day, I snooped around and located the book under his mattress. But the next time I looked it was gone and he made sure I couldn’t find it.

Over the years, I have borrowed hundreds of books from the Sarnia library. I was interested in Russian, French and American classics. I later turned to Canadian literature and was absorbed by the works of Margaret Lawrence and Hugh MacLennan, as well as short stories from my favorite writer, Alice Munro.

Years have passed, and one day in a thrift store I spotted a copy of The woman of Rome in translation. I bought it immediately. I was mature at the time and knew this was not a book about hot sex, as my young mind had assumed as a teenager.

Written by Alberto Moravia, it is a novel about passion and betrayal and explores multiple themes. In the context of Rome, he exposes immorality in a segment of society and lays bare the corruption of fascism.

Lately I’ve had a lot of time to think about my early years as an immigrant. It was not easy to adjust to a foreign country, but I am grateful for the access I had to so many books in the Sarnia library.

You don’t have to be rich to read, and reading has given me so much pleasure while giving me new knowledge.

But, best of all, it has enriched my life with fond memories of my life as a transplant in Canada.

Delia De Santis is a fiction writer living in Bright’s Grove


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Fintan O’Toole and modern Ireland https://i-racconti.com/fintan-otoole-and-modern-ireland/ https://i-racconti.com/fintan-otoole-and-modern-ireland/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 14:30:43 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/fintan-otoole-and-modern-ireland/ WHICH of our European neighbors do you think you know the least? I’m afraid to start to think that in my case it’s the Republic of Ireland. The reason is that I am currently reading Fintan O’Toole’s new book, his personal history of Ireland from the year he was born, 1958. I only have a […]]]>

WHICH of our European neighbors do you think you know the least? I’m afraid to start to think that in my case it’s the Republic of Ireland.

The reason is that I am currently reading Fintan O’Toole’s new book, his personal history of Ireland from the year he was born, 1958. I only have a hundred pages and it seems like every page reveals something I did not know the country next door. The book is called We Don’t Know Each Other. In my case, it becomes obvious that it is more about We Don’t Know Our Neighbors.

Some of the details revealed by the Irish Times columnist and author are wild, some of them biting and funny. When Edna O’Brien’s first novel, The Country Girls, was banned by Ireland’s Censorship of Publications Board in June 1960, it was just one of 35 books targeted on the same day. Others included novels by Alberto Moravia and James T Farrell. Oh, and a book called Diana Dors in 3D.

And Ireland didn’t have its own TV channel until 1961. “It was very late,” writes O’Toole. “Albania had its own TV channel before Ireland.”

But it’s the big picture that keeps you reading. O’Toole analyzes the theocratic nature of the state in its early years (I guess the Catholic Church won’t fare well from the rest of the book) and its relationship with the UK and Northern Ireland in particular.

Basically, however, it is an investigation into the arrival of modernity in Ireland and the upheavals it has caused.

Read more: Northern Ireland at 100 For Scottish readers, O’Toole’s account of the economic issues of starting independence may be particularly interesting given our own ongoing conversation on the same topic , although it is also possible to note that for O’Toole (and most Irish people, I imagine) the pros and cons of independence are not even a thing to think about anymore. Independence is only a fact of life.

Fintan O’Toole

Reading the book also made me think a bit about our knowledge deficit regarding the countries with which we share the continent. It’s a truism to say that in the UK we’re much more interested in what’s going on in Ohio than in Oslo, say, or Los Angeles than in Lisbon.

This is partly the symptom of a shared language of course. It is also a reflection of the UK’s obsession with the political “special relationship” that speaks to our desire to hang on to the tail of world power. (Because once upon a time …) It would be wrong to suggest that the British media are ignoring our European neighbors. Last weekend’s coverage of the German elections proves otherwise. And, without a doubt, the French presidential election next year will also have a good boost, if only for the Brexity possibilities of the argy-bargy Paris-London.

But that’s the danger. Too often we see what is happening in Europe through our own prism. On Monday morning’s Today program, Nick Robinson spoke with German Christian Democrat David McAllister. Robinson was particularly concerned that the proximity of the vote meant that formulating a new German coalition government could take months. For McAllister, this was just the reality of the German system.

In Scotland, we’re used to how proportional representation adds complexity to election results, but to those who have followed the teaching of Westminster’s first past the post system, it may seem foreign.

Yet, given that decentralized governments in the UK are coalitions (or, in the case of Wales, require cooperation), should this really still be the case?

Sometimes we have to look up and look around. News from elsewhere helps us.

Anyway, I’m leaving to read about Thin Lizzy and the GAA.

We Don’t Know Each Other: A Personal History of Ireland since 1958 by Fintain O’Toole, Head of Zeus, £ 25


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The Party of the People’s Republic was created in Adana https://i-racconti.com/the-party-of-the-peoples-republic-was-created-in-adana/ https://i-racconti.com/the-party-of-the-peoples-republic-was-created-in-adana/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 21:28:48 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-party-of-the-peoples-republic-was-created-in-adana/ Party of the People’s Republic September 26 is the 269th (270th day in leap years) of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 96. Railways On September 26, 1920, the deputy Nafia İsmail Fazıl Pasha went to Eskişehir and seized the Afyon-Uşak railway […]]]>
Party of the People’s Republic

September 26 is the 269th (270th day in leap years) of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 96.

Railways

  • On September 26, 1920, the deputy Nafia İsmail Fazıl Pasha went to Eskişehir and seized the Afyon-Uşak railway on behalf of the Ankara government.

Olaylar

  • 1364 – The Battle of the Indigo Serbs took place between the Ottoman army and the alliance army consisting of the Serbian Empire, the Kingdom of Hungary, the Second Bulgarian Empire, the Bosnian Banlik and the Principality of Wallachia.
  • 1907 – New Zealand declares independence from the United Kingdom.
  • 1930 – The People’s Republic Party is founded in Adana.
  • 1932 – Convening of the Turkish Language Congress. Language Day was celebrated for the first time.
  • 1940 – The Turkish-Romanian trade agreement is signed.
  • 1941 – II. The Battle for Kiev in World War II has ended.
  • 1947 – UK announces Palestinians and Jews must decide their own future; Therefore, he decided to evacuate Palestine.
  • 1964 – The Turkish and Greek Cypriot regiments are placed under the command of the Cypriot Peace Corps.
  • 1971 – Yılmaz Güney’s films receive all awards at the 3rd Golden Boll Film Festival.
  • 1978 – US President Jimmy Carter approves law lifting the embargo on Turkey.
  • 1984 – China and the UK agree to transfer Hong Kong to Chinese control in 1997.
  • 1990 – Hiram Abas, former Deputy Under Secretary of the National Intelligence Organization (MIT), is killed by the revolutionary left organization in Istanbul.
  • 1999 – 10 prisoners died in the operation held at the central closed prison of Ankara Ulucanlar.
  • 2019 – Earthquake in Istanbul: A magnitude 13 earthquake occurred at 59: 5.8 off Istanbul Silivri. 1 person died of a heart attack, 43 people were injured. Damage occurred in 473 buildings.

births

  • 931 – Muiz, 19th Caliph of the Fatimid State and 953rd Imam Ismailiyya between March 21, 975 and December 4, 14 (d. 975)
  • 1784 – Christopher Hansteen, Norwegian geophysicist and astronomer (died 1873)
  • 1791 – Théodore Géricault, French painter and lithographer (died 1824)
  • 1792 – William Hobson, first governor of New Zealand (died 1842)
  • 1816 – Paul Gervais, French paleontologist and entomologist (died 1879)
  • 1869 – Winsor McCay, American cartoonist and graphic designer (died 1934)
  • 1869 – Komitas Vartabed, Armenian priest, musicologist, composer, arranger and conductor (died 1935)
  • 1870 – Christian X, King of Denmark from 1912 to 1947 (died 1947)
  • 1874 – Lewis Hine, American photographer (died 1940)
  • 1877 – Alfred Cortot, Franco-Swiss pianist and conductor (died 1962)
  • 1884 – Arnaldo Foschini, Italian architect and scholar (died 1968)
  • 1886 – Archibald Hill, English physiologist (died 1977)
  • 1888 – TS Eliot, English poet (died 1965)
  • 1889 – Martin Heidegger, German philosopher (died 1976)
  • 1891 – Hans Reichenbach, contemporary neopositivist thinker who also taught in Turkey, where he escaped from Nazi Germany (d. 1953)
  • 1895 – Jürgen Stroop, SS General of Nazi Germany and Warsaw Ghetto Demolition Police 1942-1943 (died 1952)
  • 1897 – VI. Paulus was pope from 1963 to 1978 (d. 1978)
  • 1898 – George Gershwin, American composer (died 1937)
  • 1905 – Karl Rappan, Austrian footballer and coach (died 1996)
  • 1907 – Anthony Blunt, Soviet spy and British art historian (died 1983)
  • 1914 – Achille Compagnoni, Italian mountaineer and skier (died 2009)
  • 1914 – Jack LaLanne, American fitness expert, voice actor, actor (died 2011)
  • 1920 – Barbara Britton, American film and television actress (died 1980)
  • 1926 – Julie London, American actress and singer (died 2000)
  • 1927 – Enzo Bearzot, coach who led Italy to the title at the 1982 FIFA World Cup (died 2010)
  • 1930 – Frederick Andermann, Canadian physician and scholar (deceased in 2019)
  • 1930 – Philip Bosco, American actor (died in 2018)
  • 1932 – Joyce Jameson, American actress (died 1987)
  • 1932 – Manmohan Singh, Indian politician and 17th Prime Minister of India
  • 1933 – Donna Douglas, American actress and comedian (died 2015)
  • 1936 – Winnie Mandela, South African politician and activist (deceased in 2018)
  • 1937 – Valentin Pavlov was a Soviet official who became a Russian banker after the collapse of the Soviet Union (d. 2003)
  • 1939 – Kerem Güney, Turkish musician (died in 2012)
  • [1945–BryanFerryEnglishsinger-songwriter[1945–BryanFerryauteur-compositeur-interprèteanglais
  • 1946 – Claudette Werleigh becomes Haiti’s first female Prime Minister
  • 1947 – Lynn Anderson, American singer and country music singer (died 2015)
  • 1948 – Olivia Newton-John, Australian singer, songwriter and actress
  • 1949 – Clodoaldo, former Brazilian football player
  • 1949 Jane Smiley, American novelist
  • 1949 – Minette Walters, English writer
  • 1956 – Linda Hamilton, American actress
  • 1957 – Kalus Augenthaler, German footballer and coach
  • 1960 – Uwe Bein is a former German footballer.
  • 1962 – Mark Haddon, English novelist
  • 1962 – Al Pitrelli, American musician
  • 1964 – Nicki French, English singer and actress
  • 1965 – Petro Poroshenko, Ukrainian businessman and politician
  • 1966 – Christos Dantis, Greek singer
  • 1966 – Jillian Reynolds, Canadian actress, television host and sports presenter
  • 1968 – James Caviezel, American actor
  • 1969 – Holger Stanislawski, German coach and former football player
  • 1970 – Igor Boraska, Croatian rower and bobsledder
  • 1971 – Pelinsu Pir, Turkish theater and film actress
  • 1973 – Ras Kass, American rapper
  • 1975 – Emma Härdelin, Swedish musician
  • 1975 – Chiara Schoras, German actress
  • 1976 – Michael Ballack, German football player
  • 1977 – Kerem Özyeğin, Turkish guitarist
  • 1979 – Taavi Rõivas, Estonian politician
  • 1980 – Henrik Sedin, Swedish professional ice hockey player
  • 1981 – Asuka, Japanese professional wrestler
  • 1981 – Yao Beina, Chinese singer and actress (died 2015)
  • 1981 – Christina Milian, American R&B and pop singer
  • 1981 – Marina Maljković, Serbian basketball coach
  • 1981 – Serena Williams, American tennis player
  • 1983 – Ricardo Quaresma, Portuguese football player
  • 1984 – Müjde Uzman, Turkish actress
  • 1988 – James Blake Litherland, English singer, musician and producer
  • 1988 – Kiira Korpi, Finnish figure skater
  • 1988 – Servet Tazegül, Turkish taekwondo player
  • 1991 – Berk Atan, Turkish model and actor
  • 1991 – Yusuf Çim, Turkish singer and actor
  • 1993 – Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, American basketball player
  • 1994 – İlyas Kubilay Yavuz, Samsunspor football player
  • 1995 – Sachiro Toshima, Japanese football player

Armed

  • 1242 – Fujiwara no Teika, Japanese poet, calligrapher and sage (born 1162)
  • 1328 – Ibn Taymiyya, Arab-Islamic scholar (born in 1263)
  • 1620 – Taichang, 14th Emperor of the Ming Dynasty of China (born 1582)
  • 1826 – Alexander Gordon Laing, Scottish explorer (born 1793)
  • 1860 – Milos Obrenovic, Serbian prince (born in 1780)
  • 1868 – August Ferdinand Möbius, German professor of astronomy (born 1790)
  • 1902 – Levi Strauss, American clothing maker (Levi’s Blue Jean) (born 1829)
  • 1914 – August Macke, German painter (born 1887)
  • 1918 – Georg Simmel, German sociologist and philosopher (born 1858)
  • 1937 – Bessie Smith was an American blues singer (born 1894)
  • [1945–BelaBartokHungariancomposer(born1881)[1945–BelaBartokcompositeurhongrois(néen1881)
  • [1945–KiyoshiMikipenderMarxistJapanese(whostrivestospreadtheideaof​​anon-communistdemocraticsocialisminJapanaftertheSecondWorldWar)(bornin1897)[1945–KiyoshiMikipenseurmarxistejaponais(quis’efforçaderépandrel’idéed’unsocialismedémocratiquenoncommunisteauJaponaprèslaSecondeGuerremondiale)(néen1897)
  • 1948 – Gregg Toland, American director of photography (born 1904)
  • 1951 – Hans Cloos, German geologist (born 1885)
  • 1952 – George Santayana, Spanish-American philosopher, poet and author (born 1863)
  • 1959 – Solomon Bandaranaike, Sri Lankan politician and Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (born 1899)
  • 1973 – Anna Magnani, Italian actress (born 1908)
  • 1975 – Danyal Topatan, Turkish film artist (born 1916)
  • 1976 – Lavoslav Ružička, Croatian scientist (born 1887)
  • 1978 – Manne Siegbahn, Swedish physicist who won the “Nobel Prize in Physics” in 1924 (born 1886)
  • 1983 – Tino Rossi, French singer and actor (born 1907)
  • 1988 – Branko Zebec, former Yugoslavian international football player and coach (born 1929)
  • 1990 – Alberto Moravia, Italian novelist (born 1907)
  • 1990 – Hiram Abas, Turkish intelligence officer (born 1932)
  • 1999 – Ayşen Aydemir, Turkish actress (born 1964)
  • 2000 – Baden Powell, Brazilian guitarist and composer (born 1937)
  • 2003 – Kerim Afşar, Turkish theater artist (born 1930)
  • 2003 – Robert Palmer, English singer (born 1949)
  • 2004 – Marianna Komlos, Canadian professional bodybuilder and wrestler (born 1969)
  • 2006 – Byron Nelson, American golfer (born 1912)
  • 2008 – Paul Newman, American actor (born 1925)
  • 2009 – Nihat Nikerel, Turkish actor and writer (born in 1950)
  • 2010 – Gloria Stuart, American actress (born 1910)
  • 2012 – Johnny Lewis, American actor (born 1983)
  • 2015 – Eudoxia Maria Froehlich, Brazilian zoologist (born in 1928)
  • 2017 – Mario Bedogni, former Italian hockey player (born 1923)
  • 2017 – Robert Delpire, French art publisher, publisher, curator, filmmaker and graphic designer (born 1926)
  • 2017 – Barry Dennen, American actor, singer and screenwriter (born 1938)
  • 2017 – Květa Fialová, Czech actress (born 1929)
  • 2017 – Morton A. Kaplan, American scientist (born 1921)
  • 2018 – Chauki Maddi, Brazilian singer and songwriter (born 1929)
  • 2018 – Manuel Rodríguez, former Chilean international footballer (born 1939)
  • 2019 – Jacques Chirac, French politician and President of France (born in 1932)
  • 2020 – Adele Stolte, German soprano singer and academic singing teacher (born 1932)

Holidays and special occasions


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Sydney artist bathed in the creative light of Italy https://i-racconti.com/sydney-artist-bathed-in-the-creative-light-of-italy/ https://i-racconti.com/sydney-artist-bathed-in-the-creative-light-of-italy/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 02:58:47 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/sydney-artist-bathed-in-the-creative-light-of-italy/ She quickly made friends, starting with the consular official of the Australian Embassy, ​​Bob Hincksman, also a painter. Within a week, she was invited to a weekend in a villa in Lazio, north of Rome. There she met Isabella Tacoli. The two became the closest friends of each other for the next 45 years. Isabella […]]]>

She quickly made friends, starting with the consular official of the Australian Embassy, ​​Bob Hincksman, also a painter. Within a week, she was invited to a weekend in a villa in Lazio, north of Rome. There she met Isabella Tacoli. The two became the closest friends of each other for the next 45 years. Isabella recalls, “She met all of our friends and was loved by everyone. “

Venn-Brown’s 1989 painting of Nablus north of Jerusalem. It was the hometown of his partner Wael Zuaiter, who was assassinated by the Mossad in 1972.

Then there were the expatriates from Australia – writer David Malouf and artists Justin O’Brien, Jeffrey Smart, Peter and Susan Ward – and many others who traveled to Tuscan villages for their ‘interpretation’ of the Italian light. Janet was in a new “circle”.

She would get up and go out early, set up her easel in the streets of Rome, work until lunchtime, and return to paint in the afternoon light. The routine remained the same all her life. By the mid-1960s, Janet was in her element. In the Italian summer of 1964, two years after Janet’s arrival, she met the love of her life, Wael Zuaiter, a Palestinian translator, at an artists’ fair on Via Margutta in Rome. Janet was 39, Wael 31.

Zuaiter helped bring his paintings home and serenaded him with a song from Shakespeare’s sonnets, A lover and his daughter, while they walked. Janet later said: “I was very impressed. The fact that he knew this song that we sang at school. I was very drawn to him.

One of his painter friends, Egidio Scardamaglia, remembers: “She was madly in love, it shows. And [it was] definitely, completely mutual.

Janet spent seven happy years with her Palestinian partner. They shared literary interests, the love of beautiful music, painting and opera. Wael helped her organize a series of very successful exhibitions. Together they entertained a variety of European intellectuals like Maxine Rodinson, Jean Genet, Bruno Cagli and Alberto Moravia. They were on the social circuits of many embassies.

When Zuaiter came home one evening in August 1972 with a marriage certificate for Janet, she was elated. Her diary says she told her mother “the next time I come home, it will be with Wael”. Janet was already the best friend of Wael’s sister, Naila. The two families were ready to merge.

Venn-Brown outside his apartment in Rome.

Venn-Brown outside his apartment in Rome.

It was not to be. Two months later, on October 19, 1972, Wael Zuaiter was assassinated by an Israeli Mossad commando. This was allegedly because Zuaiter was involved in the deaths of Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics in 1972. But in November 1993, the BBC interviewed a key player in Zuaiter’s death: Major General Aharon Yariv, adviser Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir’s special on terrorism in 1972. The last question and answer was: “Q: So these people were not just people your intelligence agencies thought were responsible for Munich?” A: Not necessarily, not necessarily at all. Some of them were linked to Munich, others were not.

In 2005, an Israeli journalist from Time Aaron J Klein magazine wrote a book on the Munich murders and retaliation in 1972. On Zuaiter’s murder, he concludes: “In hindsight, his assassination was a mistake.

Janet’s take was different: she said Wael was killed because he was a nonviolent public intellectual and activist for Palestine. Her family stood behind her. His beloved niece Louise Cox, then 19, flew to Rome to help mend her aunt’s trauma. Janet edited a book, “For a Palestinian: dedicated to the voice of Wael Zuaiter”, containing a series of reflections from global public intellectuals who knew Wael. And a string of Arab embassies contacted her to offer her, now “wife” of a martyr, work. That same year, she decided to quit abstract expressionism and to paint figuratively again.

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The eight years between 1979 and 1986 were his “Arab period”. Italy takes a back seat and responds to invitations from seven Arab countries to “paint with us”. Janet’s first sight of Yemen’s capital Sana’a stunned her with its architectural beauty.

His paintings of the Persian Gulf were exhibited at the prestigious Galleria La Margherita in Rome in 1982 and received rave reviews. High traffic Unita: “There is delicacy, there is melody, there is respect for man: these are the qualities that we find in his paintings.

Despite the success, Janet had doubts about the safety of the streets of Rome. At 63, after a collision with a motorcycle, she decides to return to her age-old skills in interior painting. This was aided by his newfound fascination with an Italian interior design theorist, Mario Praz. He called it “interiority”: exploring the individual from his environment.

She started with her faithful friends: the house of Justin O’Brien, then that of Bruno Cagli and finally the studio of Jeffrey Smart. His childhood skills were very useful to him. Some of his best works were made around this time and are hung in Italian homes.

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In 1993, she had an exhibition in Cetona, near Florence. The same year, the Princess of Jordan offered him to do another exhibition in Amman. Janet agreed. In 1999, Caroline Simpson met her in Rome and asked her to paint Sydney’s historic building, the Clydebank. She accepted, but returned to Rome.

In Janet’s heart, she knew why her family in Sydney were starting to question her decision to grow old in Rome. At 72, she felt like her friends were in Italy, but her family was in Sydney. She faced an agonizing choice. It was time to go home. When she made up her mind in 2005 to leave Rome, she said her goodbyes at a big dinner in Piazza del Popolo, offered by the President of the Province of Rome.

She returned to Sydney in December 2008. For the past 13 years, she has painted Glebe interiors, attended Palestinian protests for the Women in Black group outside Sydney City Hall and regularly visited Sydney’s Italian restaurants. . She kept in touch with her friends in Italy by phone. Her determination to speak Italian whenever she could told me that Janet was still wondering if she had done the right thing.

The National Library of Australia has preserved his papers, diaries, letters and some paintings for future generations.

Peter Manning is the author of Janet Venn-Brown: A Life in Art.


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Chic destinations making waves in the Mediterranean https://i-racconti.com/chic-destinations-making-waves-in-the-mediterranean/ https://i-racconti.com/chic-destinations-making-waves-in-the-mediterranean/#respond Fri, 13 Aug 2021 08:25:49 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/chic-destinations-making-waves-in-the-mediterranean/ Travel Updates Sign up for myFT Daily Digest to be the first to know about travel news. Menorca is calling Thanks to the arrival of the powers of the art world Iwan and Manuela Wirth, Menorca is everyone’s favorite Balearic this summer. The Hauser & Wirth gallery restaurant area (actually on the small islet of […]]]>

Travel Updates

Menorca is calling

Thanks to the arrival of the powers of the art world Iwan and Manuela Wirth, Menorca is everyone’s favorite Balearic this summer. The Hauser & Wirth gallery restaurant area (actually on the small islet of Isla del Rey, in the port of Mahon) brings them like honey bees from European points and beyond. Just across the water is the island’s liveliest new hotel. Cristine Bedfor, owned and managed by the very elegant Cristina Lozano, opened in May with 21 rooms, each uniquely and lovingly designed by Lorenzo Castillo (follow him on Instagram for periodic doses of pure chromatic and aesthetic joy).

Cristine Bedfor offers 21 rooms, each uniquely designed by Lorenzo Castillo © Daniel Schaefer
Cristine Bedfor interiors are a mix of ikats and Iberian antiques
Cristine Bedfor’s interiors are a mix of ikats and Iberian antiques © Daniel Schaefer

It’s a typical continental mix of ikats and Iberian antiques, a Magistretti Carimate chair here and a bit of kilim or majolica there. Plus freestanding bathtubs, jewel balconies and perfect views over Calle de la Infanta and the rusting rooftops of the town of Mahon. Local pioneer from farm to fork His Forquilles partnered with Lozano at the hotel; the menu covers both all the delicious bases of jamon-y-queso and raises a few standards (including tacos with Menorcan rockfish and lime mayonnaise). cristinebedforhotel.com, double from 175 €


Train, rest and play in Mykonos

After two seasons in which its tourism industry (like that of so many other countries) suffered huge losses – and, more recently, with parts of the mainland and Euboea devastated by forest fires – it’s time to bring love to the many Greeks. -loved reached. So in Mykonos: while there is no end to the festivities one can have on the most festive island of the Cyclades, well-being, like everywhere else, has grown in popularity.

Helios Retreats guests stay in one of the most stylish villas in Mykonos Town

Helios Retreats guests stay in one of the most stylish villas in Mykonos Town

A sailing trip to the surrounding islands is one of the daily activities of the retreat

A sailing trip to the surrounding islands is one of the daily activities of the retreat

Helios Retreats kicked off their semi-tailored programs six years ago – think good, sweaty fitness, expert instruction, chewy digs, and beautifully plated food with sugar / fat / glycemic indices all carefully calibrated – right here. Accommodation is in one of the most elegant villas around Mykonos Town, and the menus, thanks to a long collaboration with bowl, the island’s favorite whole, raw food restaurant (run by two Australians, no), is suitably good for well-being and good taste. The days are busy, but the work is complemented by a lot of play, from quad adventures to group dinners. There is room for the last three weeks of September.

Noema's menu skews the pescatarian, with a nose-to-tail approach
Noema’s menu skews the pescatarian, with a nose-to-tail approach

And if Mykonos just wouldn’t be Mykonos for you without a deep dive into glam, Richard Caring has you covered: his band Caprice just debuted. Noema, a restaurant, a bar and a concept store around an airy courtyard in the center of the old town. There’s a smart menu that deviates from Pescatarians, programming that ranges from Aegean aperitif time to live music and late-night DJ sessions, and retail therapy tailored to the venue: fashion, jewelry and housewares, but also a smart collection of design books. helios-retreats.com, from £ 2,190 per person. noemamykonos.com


Private Positano

Il San Pietro, the family-run hotel located just south of Positano, is at the top of many people’s lists of eternal places: a timeless setting, a service for which the descriptor “unassailable” seems invented, food that makes you dream all the time. winter (my life was effectively split into a “before” and “after” scenario by the sublime experience of grilled mozzarella with lemon leaves at his beach restaurant, Carlino). Owner Vito Cinque had a brilliant idea of ​​Covid at the end of 2020, which he brought to life this year: to take over a sumptuous villa in the village of Positano close enough for selective but eminently private access.

Il San Pietro has 1,500 square feet of terraces and balconies
Il San Pietro has 1,500 square feet of terraces and balconies
Hotel decor embraces old-fashioned furnishings, with painted ceilings and multi-colored tiles
Hotel decor embraces old-fashioned furnishings, with painted ceilings and multi-colored tiles

Former episcopal palace, then private residence whose owner hosted John Steinbeck and Alberto Moravia, the 17th century, 7,400 m² Santa Croce Palace has decor that leans on the older world than the hotel, with ornate coffered and painted ceilings and multicolored tile fantasies in the bathrooms. There’s an indoor pool and outdoor hot tub, garden, compact spa with sauna and steam room, full chef’s kitchen (with pizza oven), and five bedrooms, including two huge suites. Ilsanpietro.com, from 15,700 € per night


The beautiful south

The ten hectare park of Il Santavenere is home to turkey oaks, maples, pines and bougainvillea

The ten hectare park of Il Santavenere is home to turkey oaks, maples, pines and bougainvillea

The view from the hotel overlooks the landscape around Maratea and the Mediterranean beyond

The view from the hotel overlooks the landscape around Maratea and the Mediterranean beyond

And further south, above the volcanic sand beaches of Basilicata, a secret of Italian hospitality is given that promises to be fabulous new life. Il Santavenere has long been a quiet favorite of Europeans who appreciate the patina of an old world Italian hotel experience and truly fantastic seas (and proximity to pretty towns: it’s a scenic 10 minute drive to Maratea, one of the most beautiful in Basilicata).

Last year, the Santavenere was acquired by Arsenale, the real estate fund co-owned by Nicola Bulgari; Aldo Melpignano, whose family helped put Puglia on the luxury map with Borgo Egnazia and Masseria San Domenico, manages it and has begun an ongoing reimagining of the hotel for at least two years that will see upgrades and improvements – in decor, cuisine, services and experiences – implemented over the winters. Maratea is an interesting offer – much closer to Calabria than Amalfi, and not particularly close to an airport. But the south continues to intrigue, and after the pandemic, the zeitgeist is focusing on this kind of discovery. A space and a place to watch. santavenere.it, starting at € 369

@mariashollenbarger



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Emmy Awards sold to 150 territories by Rainmaker Content https://i-racconti.com/emmy-awards-sold-to-150-territories-by-rainmaker-content/ https://i-racconti.com/emmy-awards-sold-to-150-territories-by-rainmaker-content/#respond Thu, 12 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/emmy-awards-sold-to-150-territories-by-rainmaker-content/ DISTRIBUTION International Distributor Rainmaker Content sold the Television academy‘s 73rd Emmy Awards in more than 150 territories. New buyers include AMC Networks International for Central Europe, Catchplay Plus for Indonesia and Taiwan, Mediacorp for Singapore, U-Next Co., Ltd for Japan and Sky Italia for Italy. Returning broadcasters include Turner (Latin America, German-speaking Europe), Extension TV […]]]>

DISTRIBUTION

International Distributor Rainmaker Content sold the Television academy‘s 73rd Emmy Awards in more than 150 territories. New buyers include AMC Networks International for Central Europe, Catchplay Plus for Indonesia and Taiwan, Mediacorp for Singapore, U-Next Co., Ltd for Japan and Sky Italia for Italy. Returning broadcasters include Turner (Latin America, German-speaking Europe), Extension TV (Series Club) for French-speaking Europe, Sky (UK), Telefonica (Spain), SIC (Portugal), TV2 (Denmark), M- Net (Africa), OSN (Middle East), Telenet (Belgium) and A serial (Commonwealth of Independent States).

Hosted by Cedric The Animator, star and executive producer of CBS comedy “The Neighborhood,” before a limited audience live at LA Live in Los Angeles, the awards will air on the CBS television network on September 19.

Emmy-nominated producers Reginald Hudlin and Ian Stewart will be executive producers and Hamish Hamilton will direct broadcast for production companies Done + Dusted and Hudlin Entertainment.

“The Crown” and “The Mandalorian” tied for first place in this year’s nominations with 24 nods each, followed by “WandaVision” (23), “The Handmaid’s Tale” (21) and “Saturday Night Live” (21).

PRICE

17th Zurich Film Festival (23 September-3 October) to pay tribute to the Italian filmmaker Paul Sorrentino for his cinematographic work with the A Tribute to…. Sorrentino will receive the award on September 29, at the premiere of his new film “The Hand of God”, which takes place in his native Naples. The festival will also present a retrospective of the work, which includes the Oscar-winning film “The Great Beauty”.

“Participating in ZFF this year, with my most personal film, is very exciting for me because ‘The Hand of God’ also speaks of the moment when each of us takes courage and confesses to oneself and to the others that we want. try the unconscious and crazy adventure of being a director, ”Sorrentino said.

The film stars a young actor Philippe Scotti and the longtime Sorrentino man Toni Servillo. The Netflix the film is produced by The apartment, a Fremantle Society.

SERIES

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“The Good Hustle” – (LR) Gemma Forsyth, Francesca Hung, Tammin Sursok, Sophie Bloom, Brooke Lee and Lisa Flanagan.
Little giant

New Australian production company Little giant set the ten-part television drama series “The Good Hustle” as the debut project. Executive produced by Joel kishinevsky and produced by Elle Croxford and Alexandra Doering, the series investigates the lives and careers of five female employees of a high-pressure public relations firm run by an infamous (female) boss. The cast is directed by Tammin Sursok (“Pretty Little Liars”, “Hannah Montana”, “The Young and the Restless”), Francesca Hung (E! Host Australia), Lisa Flanagan (“Glitch”, “Cleverman”), Gemma Forsyth (“Mako Mermaids”, “H2O: Just Add Water”), Brooke Lee (“Mako Mermaids”, “Stage Mums”) and Sophie Bloom (“Love Child”, “Tricky Business”). Production will start towards the end of the year. – Patrick frater

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“Sky Rojo” Season 2
Credit: Netflix

SEASON

Netflix has confirmed the third and final season of its Spanish revenge thriller series “Sky Rojo” from the creator of “Money Heist” Alex pina, co-written with his long-time collaborator Esther martinez. The new episodes of season three will begin six months after Coral (Verónica Sánchez), Wendy (Lali Espósito) and Gina (Yany Prado) complete their final battle with their former pimp Romeo (Asier Etxeandia), who is anything but satisfied with the continuation of things. disabled. Produced by Pina’s Vancouver Media, the first two seasons of “Sky Rojo” were produced at the same time, the first season being released in March of this year and the second in July. Originally developed as a trilogy, Thursday’s announcement confirms that the series will have its scheduled finale. No details of the version have yet been shared. – Jamie Lang

TRIBUTE

For the first time, the Venice Film Festival, Venice Days and the International Venice Critics’ Week together celebrate the career of filmmaker Francesco ‘Citto’ Maselli and also his role at the head of the ANAC (Associazione Nazionale Autori Cinematografici).

After his documentary “Bagnaia paese italiano” (1949), Maselli collaborates in 1953 with Luchino Visconti on an episode of “Siamo gives” with Anna magnani, and the same year he produced “Storia di Caterina” with Cesare Zavattini, an episode of the movie “Love in the City”. He made his film debut in 1955 with “Abandoned”, a WWII film starring among others Lucie Bose. Maselli’s films portray characters and social issues in a neorealistic style, always approaching issues with ideological, political and moral engagement. Highlights of his career include “The Silver Spoon Set” (1960) “Time of Indifference” (1964), adapted from the eponymous novel by Alberto Moravia, “Kill Me Quick, I’m Cold” (1967), “A Fine Pair “(1968),” Open letter to the evening newspaper “(1970) and” The suspect “(1975).

The ceremony in honor of Maselli will take place in the Sala Grande of the Palazzo del Cinema (Lido di Venezia) on September 6. The program will also include the screening of his film “Storia d’amore”, which premiered in 1986 at the 43rd Venice Film Festival and won Valerie Golino the Coppa Volpi. The film will be screened with a restored copy provided by the Istituto Luce Cinecittà.

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Francesco maselli
Venice Film Festival


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Bridge: Blackwood can transfer declarer | https://i-racconti.com/bridge-blackwood-can-transfer-declarer/ https://i-racconti.com/bridge-blackwood-can-transfer-declarer/#respond Wed, 04 Aug 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/bridge-blackwood-can-transfer-declarer/ Alberto Moravia, Italian novelist, affirms: “You become a writer, but you have to be born a novelist. If a person has sensitivity, culture and imagination, it is not difficult to become a writer. It is impossible to become a novelist, storyteller or fableur; either you have a natural gift for storytelling or you don’t. Likewise, […]]]>

Alberto Moravia, Italian novelist, affirms: “You become a writer, but you have to be born a novelist. If a person has sensitivity, culture and imagination, it is not difficult to become a writer. It is impossible to become a novelist, storyteller or fableur; either you have a natural gift for storytelling or you don’t. Likewise, the best bridge players are born with a natural gift. Others may be competent but will never be great.

In today’s deal, the North bid and the South played imaginatively. Look at North’s hand first. You play rubber bridge for high stakes. Your partner, bless him, open four spades. After your opponent on the right passes, what would you do?

To the north was Robert Sheehan, a prominent British international. It sounded like a clean pass, but Sheehan, hoping his partner had an ace, answered four Blackwood singles with no trumps. Then, when her partner bid five diamonds, Sheehan got it right! At first, South was not amused, but note that four spades could have been defeated.

South, after cutting the club’s lead to the model and pulling the trumps, had to play only heart for just two losers. Realizing he couldn’t help but start with one of the model’s honors, South called out the heart two. When East played low, South took a break. It sounded like a guess between fine-tuning the eight (playing East for the nine) and going up with the 10 (playing East for the jack). However, if East had the jack, maybe he would have played it to prevent South from having a singleton 10. So South refined his eight.

When West won with the jack, South claimed his contract, conceding a second crush.


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