Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:39:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://i-racconti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ 32 32 Taylor Swift’s New Song ‘Carolina’ Based on Delia Owens’ Novel ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ https://i-racconti.com/taylor-swifts-new-song-carolina-based-on-delia-owens-novel-where-the-crawdads-sing/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:39:25 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/taylor-swifts-new-song-carolina-based-on-delia-owens-novel-where-the-crawdads-sing/ NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! Taylor Swift had a sweet surprise in store for her fans on Thursday. Swift, 32, has released her new song, “Carolina,” which is based on Delia Owens’ novel “Where the Crawdads Sing.” The award-winning novel has been turned into a film, which will be released on July […]]]>

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Taylor Swift had a sweet surprise in store for her fans on Thursday.

Swift, 32, has released her new song, “Carolina,” which is based on Delia Owens’ novel “Where the Crawdads Sing.”

The award-winning novel has been turned into a film, which will be released on July 15. “Carolina” will be featured in the film, and the release marks Swift’s first single since her 2020 album “Evermore.”

Taylor Swift based her new song “Carolina” on Delia Owens’ novel, “Where the Crawdads Sing.”
(Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy)

“About a year and a half ago I wrote a song about an incredible story, the story of a girl who has always lived on the outside, looking inside,” Swift explained. on Instagram. “figuratively and literally.”

TAYLOR SWIFT REDUCES ‘THIS LOVE’ 8 YEARS LATER

She continued, “The juxtaposition of her loneliness and her independence. Her longing and her stillness. Her curiosity and her fear, all tangled up. Her lingering sweetness…and the world’s betrayal of her. I wrote this one alone in the middle of the night and then @aarondessner and meticulously worked on a sound that we believe would be authentic to the time this story unfolds.

“I made a wish that one day you would hear it. ‘Carolina’ is out now,” she concluded.

Swift has been sharing on her social media platforms her interest in “Where the Crawdads Sing” for several months.

TAYLOR SWIFT’S NYU COMMENCEMENT SPEECH HITS CANCEL CULTURE

In March, she wrote, “Where The Crawdads Sing is a book I got completely lost in when I read it years ago. As soon as I heard there was a movie in the works starring the incredible Daisy Edgar-Jones and produced by the brilliant Reese Witherspoon, I knew I wanted to be a part of it on the musical side.”

The musician shared the sentiment as the film released its official trailer.

Olivia Newman, Reese Witherspoon, Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith and Delia Owens attend the

Olivia Newman, Reese Witherspoon, Daisy Edgar-Jones, Taylor John Smith and Delia Owens attend the ‘Where The Crawdads Sing’ Photocall in Los Angeles.
(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/FilmMagic)

Last week, Swift stopped the 21st Tribeca Festival where she discussed the transition to the director’s chair, the nuances of visual storytelling and the possibility of future film projects with Mike Mills, writer and director of “C’mon, C’mon” and “20th Century Women “.

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She then surprised fans with special guests and an acoustic performance.

Swift greeted fans as she arrived at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Swift greeted fans as she arrived at the Tribeca Film Festival.
(Photo by Gotham/GC Images)

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“I always thought it was something other people were doing,” Swift said of directing. Being on sets and making music videos, “the lists of things I was absorbing got so long that by the end, I thought I really wanted to do this.”

Swift wrote and performed “Carolina” in “Where the Crawdads Sing” which will be released on July 15.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Sudha G. Tilak, translator of “Hungry Humans”, talks about the novel https://i-racconti.com/sudha-g-tilak-translator-of-hungry-humans-talks-about-the-novel/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:09:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/sudha-g-tilak-translator-of-hungry-humans-talks-about-the-novel/ Sudha G. Tilak talks about the translation of Pasitha Manidam by Karichan Kunju which is said to be the first Tamil novel with openly gay characters Sudha G. Tilak talks about the translation of Karichan Kunju Pasitha Manidamwhich would be the first Tamil novel with openly gay characters Karichan Kunju, author of many short stories, […]]]>

Sudha G. Tilak talks about the translation of Pasitha Manidam by Karichan Kunju which is said to be the first Tamil novel with openly gay characters

Sudha G. Tilak talks about the translation of Karichan Kunju Pasitha Manidamwhich would be the first Tamil novel with openly gay characters

Karichan Kunju, author of many short stories, short stories and plays, and an underrated but important Tamil literary figure, wrote his only novel Pasitha Manidam in 1978. Its English version titled hungry humans, translated by journalist Sudha G. Tilak, does what is expected of any good translation – it releases the book to a wider and more recent critical reception. Kamal Haasan describes the book as the “pioneering novel that launched transgressive fiction in Tamil literature” in the advanced eulogy of the book. Set in Kumbakonam, it is also a commentary on the decline of the Brahmin community in a changing world.

ALSO READ: Kumbakonam is a formidable center of modern Tamil literature

The hero, Ganesan, is a leper. After the death of his father, a wandering minstrel who had taken to stealing in the last desperate days of his life, an orphan Ganesan inherits both poverty and the traditional wisdom of body-soul duality. The city and the characters are only specificities here. The story is about the enigma called the human being.

Tilak talks about Kunju, its unflattering realism, and translation challenges in this interview. Edited excerpts:

The selling point of this book is that it features gay characters for the first time in Tamil fiction. And yet homosexuality is a small part of the novel and is represented more as an exploitative perversion. Can you comment?

Tamil Critics Didn’t Call Out Homosexuality Pasitha Manidam‘s ‘selling point’ but noted that openly gay characters are introduced here for the first time in modern Tamil literature. The novel is populated by trans men, autistic adults and children, reckless and ambitious men – likely familiar characters from other novels. However, gay characters like Singam Rauth stand out because readers had not read about gay characters in novels of that era.

Cover of

Cover of “Hungry Humans”

Rauth and his ilk are forced to lead double lives, stealthily seeking underage partners outside of their socially acceptable heterosexual unions, while Ganesan’s former neighbor Kitta may be blatantly sexually exploited as a cis man. .

Kunju shows Ganesan seduced by Rauth’s cushy life to become his partner. This is worrying because the decision is influenced by Ganesan’s poverty.

Almost all of the key female characters are presented as having a “huge appetite for sex”. What do you think?

Many of them are self-employed looking to get married or having sex on their own. The novel also shows women in traditional domestic roles who are sexually uninhibited or who cuckold their husbands. Teenage girls or middle-aged women don’t apologize for their sexual desires. Women want sex to satisfy their desires, while a heterosexual man like Kitta uses it as a method to control and exercise his power.

Is this book dealing with Brahminical hypocrisy, as Mani Shankar Aiyar points out in the advanced eulogy?

You could read it as a critique of a community and also as a novel about human struggles – social, sexual and economic. Kunju shows that certain Brahmin characters are capable of profound acts of kindness. Ganesan’s adoptive father is anonymous and simply referred to as a teacher. Perhaps Kunju wants to show that compassion goes beyond names and caste placeholders.

The temple city of Kumbakonam and its Brahmins were once considered the vanguard of Thanjavur’s culture and social rights in Tamil Nadu. Kunju knew both and turned his unflattering gaze on human duplicity and Brahminical pride within and without.

Philip Roth wrote about Newark and its Jewish family because he knew them intimately. His works spoke of his self-hatred at the sexual frailties and hypocrisies of Jews and the irony inherent in their sense of self-importance. All humans pretend. Many authors call the pretext more clearly when writing about one of their own.

Are there any biographical overtones in the novel?

Yes, Kunju lost his father when he was little and his young widowed mother struggled to raise him. I also read that he spent time as a child in the chatrams or caravans for the homeless in and around Kumbakonam. Despite being a prolific writer and translator, he never saw much money. But he was a socialist and tried to educate his daughters with his meager income.

By showing Ganesan become an ascetic, what do you think is the message of the novel?

I would summarize this as the Advaita Vedanta philosophy, specifically the last conversation between Ganesan and Kitta. Salvation or liberation is achieved when the human self realizes that pain and pleasure on earth are transitory. No one has ever achieved holiness without swimming in sinful currents, right? I felt relieved that there was no glaring message in this novel.

What were your choices as a translator with replies like “We have enough for a vegetable side” or “I ran to ruin by marrying a person who is neither here nor there”?

Hard choices! And I had many more. I thought to make it easier for the reader who is comfortable with English but also familiar with Indian bhasha cadences.

Did your interpretation of the novel interfere with your translation?

I started as a critical reader of Pasitha Manidam. But as a translator, my job was to be as faithful to the text as possible and not to judge it through the moral prism of the 21st century or the eyes of a critic.

Interviewer, winner of the Sahitya Akademi Translation Prize, is associated with Christ University of Bengaluru.

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Tomorrowland EDM Music Festival Is Developing Fantasy Novel Series https://i-racconti.com/tomorrowland-edm-music-festival-is-developing-fantasy-novel-series/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:20:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/tomorrowland-edm-music-festival-is-developing-fantasy-novel-series/ Dance music festival Tomorrowland – dubbed the “Disneyland of Music Festivals” by the EDM world – is developing a series of fantasy novels with the potential to become a film or TV franchise, Variety can exclusively reveal. Brothers Manu and Michiel Beers created the festival, which features otherworldly visuals, artists and lighting, in Belgium in […]]]>

Dance music festival Tomorrowland – dubbed the “Disneyland of Music Festivals” by the EDM world – is developing a series of fantasy novels with the potential to become a film or TV franchise, Variety can exclusively reveal.

Brothers Manu and Michiel Beers created the festival, which features otherworldly visuals, artists and lighting, in Belgium in 2005. It has since been spun off across the world, including versions in the United States and in Brazil.

The larger-than-life music festival, which saw Katy Perry headline a virtual iteration in 2020, is now using the intellectual property it created to turn the Tomorrowland universe into a novel series.

UTA’s Jason Richman is taking over the screen rights to the book while Paul Lucas of Janklow & Nesbit will oversee the books.

“Tomorrowland presented incredible themes, visuals and experiences to festival goers around the world,” said Richman. “I’m thrilled to partner with them, build on their legacy with this fantastic new series, and bring it to the big screen.”

Lucas added: “Tomorrowland is internationally recognized for its world-building and has successfully linked this unique magic with their core values ​​of unity, hope, love, nature and health in an enchanting debut novel. of a trilogy. I think the quality of the writing and the themes of the series will both captivate Tomorrowland fans and find a new audience among fantasy readers.

Tomorrowland founder Michiel Beers said: “Every year, Tomorrowland presents a new festival theme, which is brought to life via a beautiful trailer, on the legendary Mainstage and throughout the festival grounds. Since the stories and characters of each theme cannot fully express themselves during the festival, we have dreamed for years of taking more time to develop them. Three years ago we created our fiction department, where together with a passionate team we bring to life the magical worlds and plots of the Tomorrowland themes. We aim to build a legacy of storytelling and look forward to sharing our stories with the world in the years to come.

“We are thrilled to partner with Paul Lucas and be adopted into his lineup of all-star talent,” Beers continued. “Paul shares our fondness for great fantasy stories, so we can’t wait to take our first steps into publishing with him. We’re thrilled to have Jason Richman take on the book-to-screen rights to the series under his wing, as he knows Tomorrowland’s DNA well and is an expert in his field at United Talent Agency. With Paul and Jason’s representation, we believe our dream may soon come true.

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A conservative judge writes a book about love and reconsiders his point of view https://i-racconti.com/a-conservative-judge-writes-a-book-about-love-and-reconsiders-his-point-of-view/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:21:46 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/a-conservative-judge-writes-a-book-about-love-and-reconsiders-his-point-of-view/ Placeholder while loading article actions When the protagonist of “Love in deep twilight‘ suggests that his gay friends should respect the fact that ‘well-meaning traditionalists are right to value what they value’, the answer is blunt. “I don’t concede for a minute that the so-called nice traditionalists are right to have an opinion on our […]]]>
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When the protagonist of “Love in deep twilight‘ suggests that his gay friends should respect the fact that ‘well-meaning traditionalists are right to value what they value’, the answer is blunt.

“I don’t concede for a minute that the so-called nice traditionalists are right to have an opinion on our lives,” replies her black lesbian friend. “Because they don’t have the privilege of making their point if they haven’t experienced bigotry.”

The fictional exchange is surprising, mainly because of who wrote it. He appears in a novel published in February by J. Harvie Wilkinson III, one of the most conservative judges on the United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, appointed by Ronald Reagan in 1984.

Wilkinson, 77, said in an interview that in writing the book, published by Milford House Press, he wanted to escape the “acrimony, intolerance and venom” of political life. Its protagonist, Leah, grapples with deeply personal issues: whether to leave her small Pennsylvania town for better career options, how to deal with a tragic death, whether to forgive an intimate betrayal. Although “romantic,” it’s not exactly a romance novel, Judge said.

“Sometimes things are more exciting when they’re talked about than when they’re just laid bare,” Wilkinson said. ” I do not think so [these characters] would have liked their private sex acts to be simply spread out on pages for everyone to visit.

He said he wanted to write from a female perspective in part to develop her own empathy.

“I wanted to reach worlds beyond my own little island conclave,” he said.

In his daily work, his positions remain resolutely conservative. In a recent case on whether a North Carolina charter school could require girls to wear skirts, Wilkinson wrote a controversial dissenting opinion on the side of the school. He argued that the application of the 14th Amendment’s equal protection clause to a charter school – the central issue of the case – could “extinguish the place of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the education system” and felt that “for many people, dress codes represent an ideal of chivalry that is not condescending to women, but who appreciates and respects them. ”

In written opinions, other judges took aim at Wilkinson’s comments.

James A. Wynn Jr., a black judge appointed by President Barack Obama, denounced what he claimed were Wilkinson’s “borderline insulting innuendos” that HBCUs “benefit from unconstitutional racial discrimination.” (HBCUs are open to all races; they receive the HBCU designation if they were founded before 1964 and focused primarily on educating black Americans.)

Judge Barbara Milano Keenan, also appointed by Obama, questioned the invocation of “an era when men could assault their wives and commit other violent crimes against them with impunity”.

The other two justices who signed Wilkinson’s dissent are white men.

Wilkinson wouldn’t talk about the case, but regarding his perspective, he said, “I recognize that my perspective is limited, that I have to grow, that I have to identify with other situations and with other people. There is room for change and room for reaching out. But also, I am who I am.

Wilkinson made its protagonist, Leah, a defense attorney who stakes her credibility on a client who has committed a violent assault. But he says his thinking about crime and punishment, where his rulings tend to favor prosecutors, hasn’t changed much. Leah spends more time emphasizing pay and hours than systemic injustice.

However, some of his opinions have changed over time, as evidenced by the book.

In a 2006 Washington Post column opposing state constitutional amendments to ban same-sex marriage, Wilkinson argued that homosexuals had no right to marry under the U.S. Constitution and noted that he was not asserting “that same-sex marriage is a good or desirable phenomenon.”

“In a theoretical sense, I think I was right, as far as the constitutional structure is concerned,” he said in an interview. “But in a more personal sense and in a deeply humanitarian sense, I was wrong. … I’m glad the Supreme Court did what it did.

The Supreme Court ruled in 2015 that the Constitution required same-sex couples to be allowed to marry. But some legal experts say they fear the opinion could be reversed. The concern is based on the reasoning of a leaked draft opinion suggesting the court will end the constitutional right to abortion. The same logic, analysts say, could be applied to the same-sex marriage ruling. A new wave of anti-LGBT legislation and rhetoric has swept across the country.

Wilkinson said it would be “beyond cruelty” to annul existing same-sex marriages.

The judge sends numerous clerks to Supreme Court registrars — including Louis Capozzi, a current clerk to Justice Neil M. Gorsuch who helped Wilkinson with the novel. (Capozzi did not respond to a request for comment.) Gorsuch was the surprise author of a recent advisory expanding protections for gay and transgender people.

“I have great faith in the Supreme Court that they would never take that step,” Wilkinson said of a possible overturning of the same-sex marriage ruling. “It would be so harmful to so many individual lives, and it would cause such pain. And the legal consequences of that would be so difficult to untangle.

He said he also wanted to use the book to highlight the intolerance he still sees in this country seven years after this decision.

“I can highlight the problem; I don’t know the answer,” he said. “What worried me was that we’re too much of a nation of enclaves, where minorities or gay people feel perfectly safe and valued in many places, and then 100 different miles away or even a whole lot less, they have to be on their guard.”

Now he is working on his next novel, about a friendship between an isolated man and his neighbor.

“I don’t think a federal judge has written a love story before,” he said. “Maybe it’s outrageous, but I don’t think so.”

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A New Way to Escape: Award-Winning Tulsan Novel Inspires New Escape Room | Arts & Theater https://i-racconti.com/a-new-way-to-escape-award-winning-tulsan-novel-inspires-new-escape-room-arts-theater/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/a-new-way-to-escape-award-winning-tulsan-novel-inspires-new-escape-room-arts-theater/ It was a new idea born out of necessity. Leah Wietholter was convinced that the two vacant offices in the building where her business is located would be the perfect place for an escape room. She knew the kind of experience she wanted to create and knew that her husband Chris’ experience in personalized home […]]]>

It was a new idea born out of necessity.

Leah Wietholter was convinced that the two vacant offices in the building where her business is located would be the perfect place for an escape room. She knew the kind of experience she wanted to create and knew that her husband Chris’ experience in personalized home automation would help make the experience even more real and immersive.

The one thing Leah Wietholter couldn’t do was create a story.

“I’m a forensic accountant and a private investigator, so making up stories is not something I’m comfortable doing,” she said. “That’s when I thought about finding a detective novelist who would accept his work being suitable for this.”

Wietholter said she wanted it to be a writer from Oklahoma, and whose books would suit the kind of family clientele she hoped the escape room would attract.

She began researching crime novelists in the state and soon came across a recently published book by Tulsa writer Mary Coley, titled “Blood on the Mother Road.”

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“Blood on the Mother Road: No Place to Hide” is the second in Coley’s series of novels about Claire Northcutt, a freelance journalist. She’s working on what should be a report on life along Route 66 in small towns like Persimmon, Oklahoma.

However, her investigative instincts are piqued when her early interviews lead to suspicions that something is wrong with this small town – something that could involve the local cafe’s new waitress and Holt, a former boyfriend of Claire’s, a security agent. undercover DEA, whose work also brought him to Persimmon.

“I got this call out of the blue,” recalls Mary Coley. “It was Leah, who explained that she had read my book and loved it, and wanted to know if I would be willing to have the script used for an escape room.”

Thus was born Novel Mysteries, a new escape room experience that opened a few weeks ago just east of downtown Tulsa.

“It’s kind of a dream come true,” said Leah Wietholter. “I knew I wanted to be an investigator since I was a kid. And personally, I love escape rooms, and we’ve been to them all over the country. We wanted to make it a really first-class experience.

After a brief introduction and introduction to the rules, guests are ushered into a room that resembles the kind of office the manager of a small-town restaurant might retreat to to work on the books, work out the week’s schedule or just sit quietly. for a few moments.

What it is, however, is a kind of prison – as guests are told by a character’s disembodied voice. And they have 75 minutes to figure out how to escape from the office and then from the restaurant itself, or something terrible will happen.

The premise of the escape room comes directly from a scene in Coley’s novel.

“We worked with puzzle designers in the UK, and in our discussions they said, ‘Well, there’s the scene where a character is locked in the restaurant,'” Chris Wietholter said. “And we thought, ‘Oh, yeah, that’s going to work!'”

Originally, the time limit was set at 60 minutes, said Chris Wietholter. But after initial beta testing, they determined that there was only about a 20% success rate among those who played the game, so the time was increased.

“That’s also why we recommend having at least three people in your party,” he said. “There’s a lot to be done to figure it all out, and it’s often helpful to have people with different ways of thinking working together.”

Leah Wietholter said one thing they wanted for their “Blood on the Mother Road” experience was for everything to be grounded in reality. The office and restaurant contain most of the elements one would expect to see in such places, from desks and filing cabinets to tables and chairs, adding machines and condiment containers, neon signs and jukebox.

Yet any of these common elements could turn out to be a clue that brings us closer to the solution and a way out of this predicament.

“Blood on the Mother Road” earlier this year won the 2022 Oklahoma Book Award for Best Novel. Coley has previously been a finalist for the award twice. Her first book in the Claire Nothcutt series, “Blood on the Cimarron,” won the Tony Hillerman Award from the New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards (Coley and her husband split their time between Tulsa and Santa Fe, New Mexico).

Coley has written eight books, most of which are set in Oklahoma. His first novel, “Cobwebs,” included the Osage Reign of Terror, later made famous by David Grann’s “Killers of the Flower Moon,” as an integral part of its plot.

The Claire Northcutt series grew out of Coley’s own career in journalism.

“In my early books, my main character was a science teacher, and I wanted to write about a different type of character,” Coley said. “I worked for the Ponca City News for a while, and I always seemed to draw inspiration from the things I learned back then. So I decided to make this character a journalist, who would naturally investigate while trying to come up with a story.

The setting for “Blood on the Mother Road” is fictional, although Coley has stated that it was inspired by an actual town in Oklahoma.

“If people pay attention to how certain places are described, I think they will be able to understand,” she said. “It was a bit difficult to come up with the name of a city that looked like Oklahoma, but isn’t. We have some unusual town names in this state.

james.watts@tulsaworld.com

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Review of Werner Herzog’s novel The Twilight World https://i-racconti.com/review-of-werner-herzogs-novel-the-twilight-world/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:09:44 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/review-of-werner-herzogs-novel-the-twilight-world/ Placeholder while loading article actions Werner Herzog has portrayed the poetic excesses of the human drama as a brilliant director, producer and screenwriter of over 60 feature films and documentaries, author of over 12 books and director of over a dozen operas. His first novel, “The Twilight World”, is a free and lyrical tale about […]]]>
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Werner Herzog has portrayed the poetic excesses of the human drama as a brilliant director, producer and screenwriter of over 60 feature films and documentaries, author of over 12 books and director of over a dozen operas.

His first novel, “The Twilight World”, is a free and lyrical tale about Hiroo Onoda, a real Japanese lieutenant who terrorized the Filipino villagers of Lubang Island with guerrilla tactics for 29 years after the end of the Second World War. World War.

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Much like Herzog’s documentaries, which distill their central questions by piecing together fact as fiction under its signature philosophical storytelling, “The Twilight World” begins with the writer himself. In Tokyo in 1997 to conduct the feudal opera “Chushingura”, Herzog insults his hosts by declining an invitation from the Emperor of Japan. Shocked, someone asks Herzog who he would rather meet.

“Onoda,” he replies. “And a week later, I met him.”

Herzog’s mind-bending tale looks back on Onoda’s 1974 encounter with school dropout Norio Suzuki, who traveled to Lubang Island, after compiling a to-do list for world adventures: Onoda, yeti, panda. Herzog briefly positions himself as narrator – insects, he writes, “I begin to hear with Onoda’s ears that their buzzing is not aggressive, not disturbed.” — before sliding into third person.

21 books to read this summer

Did Onoda crave his family, his sex, or his safety as he navigated the jungle, changing sides at night, sometimes walking backwards to escape stalkers? “The Twilight World” largely eschews psychology and self-reflection, which Herzog called “major disasters of the 20th century,” to tell how Onoda and his fellow soldiers Shimada and Kozuka hid munitions in oil. palm house and misread (as evidence of WWII expansion) aircraft flying to later American wars in Korea and Vietnam.

Refusing to pass explicit judgment on his subject’s devastating refusal to accept that World War II was over, Herzog nonetheless narrows the focus on who he thinks is important: Onoda. Such highlighting of a man brings to mind Herzog’s 1982 film “Fitzcarraldo.” The infamous climax of this story recapped the depraved ambitions of a future rubber baron who enlists native villagers to drag a ship through a steep jungle denuded for this purpose.

In “Conquest of the Useless: Reflections From The Making of Fitzcarraldo”, Herzog wrote, “the feeling crept into me that my work, my vision, was going to destroy me, and for a fleeting moment I let myself be taken a long, hard look at me, which I wouldn’t otherwise – out of instinct, out of principle, out of self-preservation – looking at myself with objective curiosity to see if my vision hasn’t destroyed me already.

Onoda died in 2014 at the age of 91. Public fascination with his story evokes a corrupt nostalgia for codes of conduct that demand loyalty to the chain of command no matter what. But where is the honor of ambushing the peasants who, recovering from an imposed war, harvest the rice?

Left with orders to destroy Lubang Island’s transport infrastructure but never to surrender or kill himself, Onoda is said to have killed up to 30 residents, injuring many more, for which he later been pardoned. Readers of “The Twilight World” would not learn the human cost of Onoda’s unwavering ignorance because the narrative adheres to his resourceful survival.

Beautifully translated from German to English by Michael Hofmann, “The Twilight World” reveals the soldiers’ companionship with nature and each other, but ends without examining the collective damage caused by their imperialist fantasy. Mimicking the nesting dolls with an architecture of the time from 1997 to 1974 to 1944, where she lingers before boomeranging back, the construction of the novel could have allowed more to be seen in and around Onoda.

Herzog’s Onoda is not an ahistorical madman, but rather a man with admirable focus who clings to life and refuses to give up a fight. Onoda has been turned into an instrument of war, a stoic intention that obliges Herzog. “’Sometimes,’ says Onoda, ‘I feel like there’s something about these weapons that’s beyond human control. Do they have a life of their own, as soon as they are conceived? And doesn’t war also seem to have a life of its own? Does war dream of war? »

Having lost his men to surrender and gunfire, Onoda “walks around alert, sees everything, hears everything. He is always ready. But he is not allowed to just be in the jungle, to be part of nature. He is apart and is part. Unaware of found diaries, dropped leaflets and loudspeaker recordings of his brother’s voice, he did not leave the jungle until 1974, after Suzuki brought the 88-year-old former commander of Onoda , to issue formal orders announcing the end of the war and relieving him of his duties. .

In his feverish search for ecstatic truths, Herzog gave readers a portal to human madness, self-discipline and domination – surely his life’s work.

Kristen Millares Young is an award-winning journalist, essayist and author of the novel “Subduction.”

Penguin Press. 144 pages. $25

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Author DL ​​Davies Publishes Breathtaking Dystopian Novel: A Delight for the Reader’s Soul https://i-racconti.com/author-dl-davies-publishes-breathtaking-dystopian-novel-a-delight-for-the-readers-soul/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 21:27:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/author-dl-davies-publishes-breathtaking-dystopian-novel-a-delight-for-the-readers-soul/ Gee, book cover DL Davies SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA, USA, June 13, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The world is becoming increasingly tense with all the major events happening day by day, from the terrifying effects of global plastic pollution to the threats of international war triggered by the bombing of Ukraine. An inevitable chaos is waiting to […]]]>

Gee, book cover

DL Davies

SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA, USA, June 13, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The world is becoming increasingly tense with all the major events happening day by day, from the terrifying effects of global plastic pollution to the threats of international war triggered by the bombing of Ukraine. An inevitable chaos is waiting to be unleashed on this world. In the book “Gee” by DL Davies, a dystopian world unfolds within our grasp. On each page, Davies unveils a perfect ploy to draw emotional and mental tension to his readers through the story of a child named George Elandier Evansen or better known as “Gee”, living in a post-apocalyptic era.

DL Davies is a 79-year-old military veteran, welder, and auto mechanic who enjoys creating fictional realities of our world in both the past and the future. He is the profound author of the impressive Cuauhtémoc series with four standing books. Davies is proud of his works, with his book, Gee, at the forefront of its recent publication.

Besides the hectic plot and vividly exposed settings, Davies could easily instill fantasy into reality. An editorial review by Philip Zorarro of hollywood book review shared, “Underestimating Gee by his aw-shucks attitude is to your regret. Gee may be young but is scrappy. He will fight for what is right in every situation. A robbery from a bunch of bullies leads to the discovery of a large cache of goods. Gee possesses a magical ability to access these goods almost at will.”

There is greatness in every struggle one will encounter. Gee is the epitome of calm in the midst of chaos and justice in the midst of betrayal. The book takes readers to a place where survival is at its worst, a cannibal state. Despite his “gifts”, Gee still finds himself losing everyone he loves. However, this does not take away what remains of humanity in this young boy.

Zorarro then adds, “Gee is a positive story about the most negative scenario, living in a damaged world. Gee quickly proves a worthy protagonist who deserves support in his attempts to persevere in a decaying society. Abilities Gee’s supernatural powers are only surpassed by his depth of compassion. Author DL ​​Davies has created a character whose circumstances are tragic but who possesses an inner determination that speaks volumes. Gee has no respite within him, which makes it all the more interesting.

DL Davies is also a pretty enticing author. The Moving Words Review writes: “What I liked most was the style and language used by the author. The conversational style and well-thought-out humor serve up a seamless reading experience.” His readers have been constantly amazed since his Cuauhtémoc series, to discover this one-of-a-kind plot with Gee.

What could he post next? Hope to find out soon!

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The moving words
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The Trailer – Gee

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Faïza Guène: ‘We wanted me to say: Thank you France’ | Fiction https://i-racconti.com/faiza-guene-we-wanted-me-to-say-thank-you-france-fiction/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/faiza-guene-we-wanted-me-to-say-thank-you-france-fiction/ Faïza Guène is the Best-selling, award-winning Franco-Algerian author of six novels set largely among the Algerian community living in the outskirts of Paris. She rose to fame in 2004 at age 19 with the publication of love tomorrow (like tomorrow), who used street slang to capture the world of 15-year-old Doria, who grew up on […]]]>

Faïza Guène is the Best-selling, award-winning Franco-Algerian author of six novels set largely among the Algerian community living in the outskirts of Paris. She rose to fame in 2004 at age 19 with the publication of love tomorrow (like tomorrow), who used street slang to capture the world of 15-year-old Doria, who grew up on the misnamed estate of Paradise. His latest novel, Discretion, tells the story of the Taleb family over seven decades and their journey from a small village in Algeria to the Parisian suburb of Aubervilliers.

Why did you put the matriarch Yamina, whose children born in France are nurtured and overwhelmed by a love that “overflows like the Mediterranean”, at the heart of your book?
There are a few memoirs, and studies by historians or sociologists, on Algerian immigrant workers in France. These [men] had a role to play, even if they were exploited, while women stayed at home. So we never heard of them. It was important to me that such a woman be the central character in my story.

How far is it based on your mother?
All the parts about children and contemporary France are made up, but everything that happens in Algeria is very close to what my mother experienced. While working on the novel, I asked her about her earliest childhood memory. It was the scene of the French soldier who entered their house in Algeria and pointed a gun at his little brother.

Your novel is very frank about family tensions and the difficulties of the younger generation in finding love. Given the hostile stereotypes about Algerians in France, have you ever felt the desire to present your characters in a more overtly “positive” light?
I tried to be faithful to the characters I had in mind. There are not many representations of Algerian families in France. They are mostly caricatures – either heroes or delinquents and terrorists. My way of being honest is to make them complex, neither black nor white.

Discretion also evokes the events of October 17, 1961, when the Parisian police killed dozens of Algerian pro-independence demonstrators. How did you come to make a film about the massacre, even before having written your first novel?
I was taking part in a workshop near my house, where we had to propose documentary projects for the local television. I was working with a retired audiovisual arts teacher. He started telling me about the massacre and I was stunned. I thought it was revolting not to know. I went home and started talking to my parents and saw that my father was very upset. And I learned that he had participated, that he had been arrested and locked up for two days in the Palais des Sports. It was the bloodiest act of repression in Paris since the Paris Commune [1871], with 300 dead. Even before that, there were many Algerians hanged in woods like the Bois de Vincennes. This story is still present and still haunts us.

What was it like to become famous at a very young age?
For a while I was all over the press, but in the pages of society and not on the literary or cultural pages. That tells you everything! I quickly realized that I was a disappointment. People wanted me to say, “Thank you, France. Thanks to you, I was saved by literature. But I said, “No, I’m grateful to my community, my parents, my family. I didn’t want to tell the story of the little Arab girl who was saved by reading.

Can you tell us about Oussekine, the series you co-wrote for Disney+, which recreates the story of Malik Oussekinethe A 22-year-old Algerian student bludgeoned to death by French police in 1986?
It became a very symbolic event, which co-opted grief and grief from the family. We wanted to describe the reality of what they experienced. It also allowed us to describe what it meant to be Arab in France in the 1980s, the reality of racism and the violence of French-style assimilation. The children believed in “the republican promise” and really tried to integrate as much as possible, then this drama made them realize that they were still considered first and foremost as Arabs.

What did you mean when you said you wrote like Zinedine Zidane play football?
When Zidane plays football, he relies on immense technical skills, but 10-year-olds watching him think it looks easy and want to become footballers themselves. When I write, people shouldn’t see the difficulty of what I do. The effort should not be apparent in the book.

Which writers have been important to you in helping you find your own voice?
At first, I was inspired by my life, by the stories I heard. I read a lot, but without “sanctifying” literature. We are the heirs of an oral culture transmitted from generation to generation. There was a tradition of storytelling even though there were no books. A little later, I discovered JD Salinger, who used a very lively style to write about adolescence, then John Fante and more recently James Baldwin.

Can you name a contemporary English-speaking writer that you particularly admire?
Bernardin Evaristo. I liked his particular voice and his way of telling a story in Girl, Woman, Other. I recognized myself a lot in this book and it was different from what I had found among French writers.

What book have you recently been impressed by?
I received a letter from a woman who was almost 90 years old, a Frenchwoman who had been a teacher in Algeria. She wrote to tell me that she had no heirs and no money but a library with many novels from her time in Algeria. When she read Discretion, she realized that she wanted to leave me her books. His letter made me cry. She sent me a box with all the books. It was wonderful, full of incredible things: the first manifestos of the National Liberation Front [the Algerian independence movement]novels by Algerian authors in Arabic and a French translation of what is considered the first official Algerian novel, The south wind by Abdelhamid Benhadouga. It is an extraordinary book.

Discretion by Faïza Guène, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, is published by Saqi Books (£12.99). To support the Guardian and Observer order your copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply

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‘Steadfast’ debut written ‘for something to do’ during lockdown wins top book prize | Australian books https://i-racconti.com/steadfast-debut-written-for-something-to-do-during-lockdown-wins-top-book-prize-australian-books/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:28:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/steadfast-debut-written-for-something-to-do-during-lockdown-wins-top-book-prize-australian-books/ First Nations writers and women authors dominated the 2022 Australian Book Industry Association (Abia) annual awards, with a debut novel by one of the country’s most promising young writers taking top honors. Love & Virtue by Diana Reid won Abia Book of the Year and Literary Fiction Book of the Year at a ceremony in […]]]>

First Nations writers and women authors dominated the 2022 Australian Book Industry Association (Abia) annual awards, with a debut novel by one of the country’s most promising young writers taking top honors.

Love & Virtue by Diana Reid won Abia Book of the Year and Literary Fiction Book of the Year at a ceremony in Sydney on Thursday night. The judges hailed the novel as “a dark and funny but unwavering insight into early adulthood”. In her review for Guardian Australia, Zoya Patel praised Love & Virtue as “a multi-layered page-turner about power, unrequited love and campus rape culture, wrapped in a coming-of-age narrative. adulthood”.

Reid’s debut novel was written in response to the Covid-19 lockdown in 2021. It has previously won the MUD Literary Award and been shortlisted for Indie Book Awards and Booksellers’ Choice Awards.

Receiving his award on Thursday evening, Reid said, “It was the craziest trip of this Word document to my desk, which I was a bit embarrassed about.”

Love & Virtue was one of the first books published by independent newcomer Ultimo Press, created during the Covid lockdown in 2020. “When they bought my book, they hadn’t published anything yet,” Reid said in his speech. “They were just getting started, and it was the most incredible privilege to be such a formative part of their journey.”

In a interview with Kate Prendergast last year, Reid said the pandemic had derailed her plans to revive the musical she co-wrote and produced – 1984! Musical comedy ! – at the Edinburgh Fringe. Having just graduated from the University of Sydney, she was without a job or income.

“If it hadn’t been for Covid, I might never have picked it up,” she said. “I really didn’t expect it to be released. I was just writing it for something to do. I think there’s a kind of freedom that comes from not expecting anyone to ever read it.

The Abias are judged by over 250 members of the book industry and recognize success in writing, publishing and selling Australian books.

Former AFL legend Adam Goodes has been named co-winner of the Children’s Picture Book of the Year category, for Somebody’s Land: Welcome to Our Country, co-written with Ellie Laing and illustrated by David Hardy .

Along with Goodes, Bundjalung writer Evelyn Araluen and her collection of poetry Dropbear won the Small Publishers Adult Book of the Year award. And former NSW Australian Youngster of the Year and Kamilaroi man Corey Tutt won book of the year for readers aged 7-12 with First Scientists: Deadly Inventions and Innovations from Australia’s First Peoples .

Women writers dominated the major categories, with Jacqueline Bublitz’s Before You Knew My Name winning General Fiction Book of the Year, while financial podcaster Victoria Devine won General Non-Fiction Book of the Year for She’s on the Money.

Amani Haydar has been named New Writer of the Year for The Mother Wound, her harrowing exploration of her father’s murder of her mother.

In children’s books, Lynette Noni won the 13+ category for The Prison Healer, while Nova Weetman won the Small Publishers Children’s Book of the Year award for The Edge of Thirteen.

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The 10 Best Sci-Fi Remakes, According To Reddit https://i-racconti.com/the-10-best-sci-fi-remakes-according-to-reddit/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-10-best-sci-fi-remakes-according-to-reddit/ No genre is as ripe for contemporary reinvention as science fiction, with Denis Villeneuve’s recent reboot of Frank Herbert’s epic Dunes setting the benchmark for cinematic retaliation. The nature of science fiction lends itself to malleability, and directors often approach a remake with the intention of putting a new spin on an already worn-out concept. […]]]>

No genre is as ripe for contemporary reinvention as science fiction, with Denis Villeneuve’s recent reboot of Frank Herbert’s epic Dunes setting the benchmark for cinematic retaliation. The nature of science fiction lends itself to malleability, and directors often approach a remake with the intention of putting a new spin on an already worn-out concept.

Naturally, however, a remake is always judged alongside its older iteration, and moviegoers on Reddit have given their thoughts on which sci-fi remakes match, or better yet, match the original.

RoboCop (2014)


Joel Kinnaman as Robocop

For many, the jury remains out on Jose Padhila’s 2014 remake of Paul Verhoeven’s classic dystopian thriller RoboCop. Critics at the time of release praised the film’s performances and action settings, but were also unimpressed with its clumsiness and the remake was considered unworthy of the critical stature offered to its predecessor.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: 10 Things That Still Hold Up In RoboCop Today

However, some members of the Reddit community still think Padhila’s film is worth watching, especially for actor Gary Oldman’s performance. Reddit user tourtmcgirt also conveys that watching a remake such as RoboCop must be judged on its standalone merits, saying, “I loved it, sure, it wasn’t as graphic as the original, but I didn’t buy a ticket for that movie to watch the ‘original.”

Dredd (2012)


Dredd points a gun at Dredd

With a screenplay by none other than Alex Garland, Pete Travis’ 2012 remake Judge Drdd was a critical and commercial success. The concept for Travis’ remake was a far cry from Danny Canon’s 1995 adaptation of the titular comic book favorite. Travis and Garland’s film was a gritty, gritty thriller that yearned to move away from the cheesiness of Canon’s film.


The consensus of critics and fans aligned with the assessment of Dredthough many in the Reddit community still have a lot of love for Canon’s 1995 adaptation. But with its jaw-dropping action, 2012 Dred is considered by many to be the best film. Reddit user PvtHudson093 cuts to the chase by comparing the two films, simply saying, “Dredd is way better than Judge Dredd.”

Total Recall (2012)


Len Wiseman’s Retaliation from Paul Verhoeven’s classic 1990 film, Total recallsuffered similar critical backlash as Jose Padhila RoboCop as soon as it comes out. Contemporary revamps of dystopian thrillers from the late ’80s and early ’90s were clearly trending in 2012, but many moviegoers on Reddit consider remakes to be underrated to say the least.


Related: Total Recall & 9 Other 21st Century Remakes That Aren’t As Bad As The Reviews

Reddit user nasty68 echoed the sentiment of the majority of fans of the original film who were willing to give the Wiseman remake a chance based on its own individual strengths, saying, “I liked the new Total recall too. I wish the story was as good as the first but (it had) awesome visuals and action. Total recall remake was a decent update to its predecessor and shouldn’t be easily dismissed.

Invasion of the Body Thieves (1978)


Donald Sutherland screaming at the end of Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Philip Kaufman’s 1978 adaptation of Jack Finney’s famous 1955 novel, body thieves, is considered by several Reddit users to be one of the best movie remakes of all time. With Donald Sutherland and Leonard Nimoy, Invasion of the Body Thieves has achieved nothing less than cult classic status among moviegoers and is widely considered superior to its 1956 predecessor of the same name directed by Don Siegel.


Reddit user gf120581 offers strictly superlatives to describe Kaufman’s remake, saying “the 1978 version of The invasion of the body thieves is one of the greatest remakes of all time for many reasons, but looking at it, one of its best features are the creepy little touches at the start.” Kaufman’s Invasion of the Body Thieves has stood the test of time to remain one of the most beloved sci-fi remakes.

Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011)


Andy Serkis as Caesar in Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes

Before Matt Reeves’ flagship sequel in 2014, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, stamped on Planet of the Apes franchise with classic status, Rupert Wyatt’s remake of the original 1968 classic gave the well-known sci-fi origin story a much-needed revamp for the modern age. Wyatt’s film is widely seen as an update to Tim Burton’s problematic 2001 remake of Planet of the Apes.


Reddit user Chatonamime writes how impressed they are with Wyatt and Reeves’ efforts, saying, “To go up and Dawn are pretty unique stories themselves. Explicitly not borrowing from any previous film. I have to say that I’m a fan of those movies because I try to have a strong story and strong characters to fill it out.” Rise of the Planet of the Apes revitalized a waning franchise and laid the foundation for a classic trilogy of films.

The Fly (1986)


Director David Cronenberg obviously has a habit of revisiting pre-existing material since he recently remade his own film, crimes of the future, which premiered at Cannes in May 2022. Cronenberg’s remake of the lesser-known 1958 film, Fly, directed by Kurt Neumann, was an instant body horror classic when it was released in 1986.

Related: David Cronenberg’s Scariest Movies, Ranked

Fans on Reddit are quick to cite Cronenberg’s seminal 1986 film as one of the best sci-fi remakes, with one user saying, “It’s really great, one of my favorite Cronenberg movies. Jeff Goldblum is brilliant in it. . It’s scary and sad, one of the best horror movies. You actually care about the main character.”

War of the Worlds (2005)


Steven Spielberg’s remake of the 1953 film of the same name, based on the popular science fiction novel by HG Wells, received a lukewarm reception from audiences and critics upon its release. Unlike many of his contemporary action films, Spielberg War of the Worlds was an intensely emotional film that focused more on family drama than the aliens themselves.

Appreciation for Spielberg’s underrated masterpiece hasn’t been lost on the Reddit community, with Redditor Firewalls saying, “It was such a fun watch! You may notice the green screen at first, but the movie grabbed me right away and after 10-15 minutes you stop looking for it. Such a fun watch for on a lazy Sunday afternoon/evening.”

Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)


tom hardy in mad max fury road

Whether Mad Max: Fury Road is technically a remake or simply the fourth installment of the madmax franchise is a subject of debate. The 2015 George Miller film has many standalone qualities, however, and is nonetheless a thrilling, jaw-dropping journey from minute one to the last and is considered one of the best films of the 2010s.


Reddit users are virtually unanimous in their appreciation of Miller’s film and Rikimaru is adamant in his support of the film, saying “Masterpiece is as I describe it too. Once in a while I’ll casually throw it away and enjoy it again”. Mad Max: Fury RoadThe endless appeal of makes it ripe for repeat viewings.

Dunes (2021)


A Bene Gesserit woman with glowing blue eyes.

David Lynch’s original 1984 adaptation of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi epic novel, Dunes was a notorious critical failure upon release, and many fans of Herbert’s novel have long yearned for a remake that does justice to the complex and outlandish world of the source material. Luckily, Denis Villeneuve’s 2021 remake did just that, and more.

Apart from a select few, most Editors agree that Villeneuve’s remake is a substantial improvement over Lynch’s problematic original adaptation, with one user saying, “I think the new Dune is better than the original.” Lynch’s bloated original struggled to match Villeneuve’s ambitious remake and with Part 2 coming soon, fans are expecting more of the same.

The Thing (1982)


Kurt Russell in The Thing

John Carpenter The thing gave terrifying new life to Christian Nyby’s classic 1951 sci-fi horror, The thing from another world, upon its release in 1982. Although it received largely negative reviews upon its first theatrical screening, Carpenter’s film has aged well and is now considered a staple classic in the horror genre.

The movie poster can be seen on the walls of most homes and movie buffs and its iconic design has long been a defining image of horror movie marathons. The Reddit community is also very impressed with Carpenter’s masterpiece, with writers on top proclaiming that “The Thing (1982) is one of my favorite films of all time”.

Next: 10 Best Sci-Fi Movies Of All Time According To Ranker

Michelle Yeoh with blood on her face in Everything Everywhere All At Once.

All everywhere, all at once Blu-ray release date revealed


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