Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 03:00:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://i-racconti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ 32 32 NYU Professor’s Novel Gets Film Adaptation https://i-racconti.com/nyu-professors-novel-gets-film-adaptation/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/nyu-professors-novel-gets-film-adaptation/ NYU professor and Brooklyn-based author Grant Ginder gathered with her husband and friends Nov. 18 to mourn the loss of her youth while celebrating her 40th birthday. But that wasn’t the only reason for the rally. “We’re celebrating the release of the film adaptation of ‘The People We Hate at Marriage,’ which is a novel […]]]>

NYU professor and Brooklyn-based author Grant Ginder gathered with her husband and friends Nov. 18 to mourn the loss of her youth while celebrating her 40th birthday. But that wasn’t the only reason for the rally.

“We’re celebrating the release of the film adaptation of ‘The People We Hate at Marriage,’ which is a novel I wrote that was released in 2017,” Ginder happily shared.

Talk about a great birthday present!

Mac McCarty, Ginder’s husband, added: “We have been married for five years. I mean, it’s kind of surreal. I’m so proud of him. He’s accomplished so much, and it’s such an amazing thing to experience and be a part of.

The film tells the story of American siblings Alice and Paul, played by Kristen Bell and Ben Platt, who reluctantly agree to attend the wedding of their wealthy half-sister, Eloise, in the English countryside alongside their mother. , Donna, played by Allison Janney.

Ginder commented on the differences between the novel and the film. “So it’s obviously a different shape. A novel and a movie are very different things, but they did a fantastic job with them. The Molyneux sisters wrote it. Lizzie and Wendy Molineux, Claire Scanlon directed it. She is incredible. They took liberties, but I was so excited to see them. And I think they really added to the story.

Ginder visited the set last October.

“I met both Ben Platt and Kristen Bell and Allison Janney as well as Cynthia Addai-Robinson, who plays Eloise in the film,” he said. “They were all amazing. They were so welcoming and so warm.

“There was brunch a few days after my visit to the set, and Alison was sitting next to me, and when the desserts arrived, she asked if she could share my dessert with me. And I was like “Absolutely. I’ll give you a kidney if you want. You’re Allison Janney!”

Brooklyn resident Ginder suddenly found himself rubbing shoulders with Hollywood’s elite, to which her husband joked:

“He has to be controlled. His head is like keep going like that. So I try to throw a few insults every day just to, like, get him back down.

Grant had a warning for viewers: “No, the famous threesome scene isn’t semi-autobiographical, but they do a great job with it in the movie. This is very fun. Ben Platt, Karan Soni and Julian Ovenden are just hilarious.

“I mean, it’s a super fun movie. The cast is amazing,” McCarty added, seriously this time.

“It’s about dysfunctional families, which I think we can all relate to. So check it out on Amazon Prime,” Ginder concluded.

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The Distinguished Lectures Committee will host Jennette McCurdy on December 5 in downtown Fayetteville https://i-racconti.com/the-distinguished-lectures-committee-will-host-jennette-mccurdy-on-december-5-in-downtown-fayetteville/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 06:20:08 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-distinguished-lectures-committee-will-host-jennette-mccurdy-on-december-5-in-downtown-fayetteville/ Submitted by the Distinguished Lectures Committee Best-selling actress and author Jennette McCurdy will deliver a moderated Q&A at 7 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 5 in downtown Fayetteville. Jennette McCurdy, actress and best-selling author, will deliver a lively question-and-answer session as part of the Distinguished Lectures Committee Series at 7 p.m. […]]]>






Submitted by the Distinguished Lectures Committee

Best-selling actress and author Jennette McCurdy will deliver a moderated Q&A at 7 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 5 in downtown Fayetteville.

Jennette McCurdy, actress and best-selling author, will deliver a lively question-and-answer session as part of the Distinguished Lectures Committee Series at 7 p.m. on Monday, December 5 at Downtown Fayetteville, 15 W. Mountain St. on the Fayetteville Square.

The event will be ticketed, so anyone planning to attend in person should book a free ticket. Ticket reservations for students, faculty, and staff who have a current uark.edu email address will be available beginning at noon on Tuesday, November 29. At noon on Wednesday, November 30, all remaining tickets will also be available to the public. Tickets will be available by clicking here: osa.uark.edu.

A livestream will be available of the live event, which begins at 7 p.m., and will be hosted on the UA Productions YouTube Channel. There will also be a recording available for U of A students, faculty and staff at video.uark.edu for 30 days after the course.

Like a New York Times A bestselling author, McCurdy has been showcasing her multitude of talents for over 20 years, with more than 100 credits to her name between film and television. Most recently, McCurdy chronicled the unflinching details surrounding his life and rise to fame in his newly released memoir, I’m glad my mother died. In the inspiring book about resilience and independence, McCurdy uses candor and dark humor as she delves into her struggles as a former child actress – including eating disorders, addiction and a complicated relationship with his overbearing mother – and how she regained control of his life.

In addition to her impressive acting resume, McCurdy is an accomplished creative. His dark and comical one-woman show I’m glad my mother died, which she wrote, directed and starred in, sold out the Lyric Hyperion Theatre. It was also published in the Huffington Post and the the wall street journal and hosts a popular podcast, Empty Inside, where she speaks with guests about uncomfortable topics in hopes of making those conversations less taboo, while learning and growing along the way.

McCurdy is currently developing a feature film, which she has written and will direct, and recently struck a deal to write her first fiction novel. McCurdy was also honored as part of the 2022 TIME100 Next list, a compilation of emerging leaders around the world who are shaping the future and defining the next generation of leadership.

Any questions regarding the event should be directed to Distinguished Lectures Committee Chair Maggie Martin at lectures@uark.edu or the Student Activities Office (osa.uark.edu).

If you are having trouble with ticketing, please contact faulkner@uark.edu or leave a message at (479) 575-5387.

This event is sponsored by the Distinguished Lectures Committee through the Office of Student Activities and is supported by the Student Activities Fee. For questions or for accommodation due to a disability, please contact the Office of Student Activities at osa@uark.edu or call 479-575-5255. The Distinguished Lectures Committee is a program of the Division of Student Affairs.

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Judge rejects part of DeSantis’ Stop WOKE law, cites 1984 novel https://i-racconti.com/judge-rejects-part-of-desantis-stop-woke-law-cites-1984-novel/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 18:38:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/judge-rejects-part-of-desantis-stop-woke-law-cites-1984-novel/ Pgovernor’s orders by Ron DeSantis (R-FL) Stop WOKE Act which restricted the incorporation of critical race theory in public university classrooms were blocked on Thursday by a federal judge who said the legislation was comparable to George Orwell’s novel 1984. Calling the law “positively dystopian,” Judge Mark Walker of the U.S. District Court for the […]]]>

Pgovernor’s orders
by Ron DeSantis
(R-FL) Stop WOKE Act which restricted the incorporation of
critical race theory
in public
university
classrooms were blocked on Thursday by a
federal judge
who said the legislation was comparable to George Orwell’s novel 1984.

Calling the law “positively dystopian,” Judge Mark Walker of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida issued a temporary injunction against parts of the law that seek to ban or restrict critical race theory at universities. public.


“One thing is crystal clear – both robust intellectual inquiry and democracy need light to thrive,” Walker wrote. “Our teachers are essential to a healthy democracy, and the decision of the State of Florida to choose which viewpoints are worth illuminating and which should remain in the shadows has implications for all of us. If our “priests of democracy “are not allowed to shed light on stimulating ideas, then democracy will die in darkness.”


DESANTIS-BACKED SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES RIDE THE GOVERNOR’S COATTAILS AMID FLORIDA’S RED WAVE

The law, first proposed by DeSantis, passed the 2022 Florida legislative session and restricted how public college professors could discuss certain race-related concepts. It banned classroom instruction and employee training that included narratives of one race’s superiority over another or that someone bore responsibility and guilt for ancestral wrongdoing due to the color of his skin.

Walker’s decision was celebrated by the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression, a free speech civil rights group that had filed a lawsuit to block the law.

“College campuses are spaces for debate, not dogma,” FIRE attorney Greg Greubel said in a press release. “Americans recognize that the government cannot be an all-powerful force authorized to control every word a teacher speaks in the classroom. is an important first step in ensuring that teachers’ First Amendment rights are respected by the State of Florida.

But the judge’s decision likely marks the first step in what promises to be a long legal battle.

In a statement to Washington ExaminerDeSantis spokesman Jeremy Redfern said the governor’s administration plans to appeal the ruling, saying it “strongly disagrees” with the judge’s injunction.


CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

“The Stop WOKE Act protects the open exchange of ideas by prohibiting teachers or employers who exercise authority over others from imposing discriminatory concepts on students as part of classroom instruction or on employees as a condition of job retention,” Redfern said. “An ‘open-minded and critical’ environment requires being free from discrimination.”

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In Non-Fiction Corner with Lauren: Not Original Sin, But “Original Grace” https://i-racconti.com/in-non-fiction-corner-with-lauren-not-original-sin-but-original-grace/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 06:55:38 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/in-non-fiction-corner-with-lauren-not-original-sin-but-original-grace/ I was so thrilled to enter Deseret Book and find a new book by one of my favorite authors, Adam Miller. I’ve always appreciated his deep, philosophical writing style, but there was something special about this book. After recently losing his father, Miller combines lessons learned from his father with what he discovered about grace […]]]>

I was so thrilled to enter Deseret Book and find a new book by one of my favorite authors, Adam Miller. I’ve always appreciated his deep, philosophical writing style, but there was something special about this book. After recently losing his father, Miller combines lessons learned from his father with what he discovered about grace in all of his studies. The author’s premise in original grace it is that instead of original sin, God gives us original grace. God doesn’t give us what we deserve, God always gives us what we need.

During his mission, Miller picked up the book Believe Christ by Stephen Robinson. Discouraged, the young missionary found comfort in Robinson’s words, which reminded him that the Lord is always there, with outstretched hand, waiting for us to take the grace he offers us. Robinson points out that words like “deserve” and “earn” do not appear in the Book of Mormon and that “all” we can do is repent. The Lord gives everyone what he needs, and since he is a perfectly loving father, we do not need to earn his love. According to Miller, “His grace is absolute.”

The author shows how our heavenly Father loves with examples of his earthly father’s love. This was, for me, by far the most striking part of the book. His father seems to be a very good example of love and gratitude, and he was an excellent teacher. I really appreciated that the author was able to use his book to pay tribute to his father and help readers reflect on the love parents have for their children that is still there. I can’t recommend this enough. If you’re going to read an Adam Miller book, let it be this one!

About the Author: Adam S. Miller is a professor of philosophy at Collin College in McKinney, Texas. He earned a BA in Comparative Literature from Brigham Young University and an MA and Doctor of Philosophy from Villanova University. He is the author of more than ten books, including Letters to a Young Mormon, An Early Resurrection, and Mormon: A Brief Theological Introduction. He and his wife, Gwen, have three children.

Original Grace: An Experiment in Restoration Thinking by Adam Miller, published by Deseret Book Company, 144 pages, available in ebook and hardcover.

Lauren is from Utah and has been an avid reader all her life. She graduated from BYU in history and currently teaches elementary school and works at a rare bookstore. She is also a guide at the Church History Museum. Her passions include travelling, spending time with her family, learning history and, of course, reading.

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November’s Best Mystery and Non-Fiction Fiction – The Irish Times https://i-racconti.com/novembers-best-mystery-and-non-fiction-fiction-the-irish-times/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 04:37:21 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/novembers-best-mystery-and-non-fiction-fiction-the-irish-times/ Fiction set during the Troubles and post-conflict years in Northern Ireland has delivered some of the most memorable Irish crime fiction of the past decade. Anthony J Quinn and his impressive series of Tyrone novels starring PSNI Detective Celsius Daly have been at the forefront of investigating the recent past, but in Murder Memory Murder […]]]>

Fiction set during the Troubles and post-conflict years in Northern Ireland has delivered some of the most memorable Irish crime fiction of the past decade. Anthony J Quinn and his impressive series of Tyrone novels starring PSNI Detective Celsius Daly have been at the forefront of investigating the recent past, but in Murder Memory Murder (Dalzell Press, £11.99) Quinn takes her investigations on a whole different plane.

The story is rooted in two unsolved murders that affected Quinn’s own family, one of which occurred during the Revolutionary War, the other in 1982 when the Quinn family’s home was invaded. by IRA men who hijacked the family car and then used it during an operation in which they shot dead an off-duty RUC policeman. Recovered from a bullet at the start of the men of the IRA, as a warning against the alert of the authorities, the young Anthony Quinn remained traumatized, the shock still resonating 40 years later.

Now a critically acclaimed detective novelist, Quinn is frustrated with the limitations of fiction, and his own too: “Each detective story poses its own technical problems, which must be solved by plot and the inferences of figure of the detective, but my detective didn’t seem to have much talent for investigating, or was it the writer who lacked talent? And so Quinn sets out – in defiance of the received wisdom not to rock the boat in the rural parishes of Tyrone where “the troubles had not yet ended” – to uncover the identity of the IRA man who handed him the ball. The result is a jaw-droppingly brutal piece of true crime writing that is ruthless in exposing the truth, no matter who it might implicate or whether it might confirm Quinn’s own suspicions of his own failure in as a writer.

The first mystery novel by Peter Papathanasiou Stoning, starring DS George Manolis, is set in the Australian Outback. In the unseen (MacLehose, £16.99) an exhausted Manolis returns home to northern Greece and specifically to the Prespa region, which is ‘a wild border’ between Greece, Albania and North Macedonia . There he finds his childhood friend Lefty missing, unsurprisingly – Lefty, according to Manolis himself, is “a shape-shifter, a chameleon with no moral compass”. If anyone were to light the fuse of anarchy, it would be Lefty. And so, a weary Manolis, disguising himself as a manual laborer, embarks on a covert investigation to find out the whereabouts of Lefty, a tricky proposition among Prespa’s permanently wary populace, who are “Greece’s misfits, descendants of war and exile”. What follows is a quirky missing person investigation, during which Manolis is reminded that “Lefty” is the nickname of Lefteris, or Freedom; that is, people who go missing in Prespa don’t always want to be found. Which give the unseen Added weight is Papathanaisou’s superb descriptions of the landscape and character of Prespa, a place where bears and wolves still roam the hills. The supposedly suspicious and cloistered people of Prespa seem surprisingly willing to answer our hero’s questions – and he asks for a plot questions – but otherwise the unseen is a classic gumshoe yarn in a fascinating setting.

“I’ve always wanted to be a writer,” DCI Terry Balance tells us at the start of Tariq Godard Great John the Conqueror (Repeater, £12.99), “but I became a policeman instead”. Set in Wessex in 2016, Godard’s novel opens with the disappearance of Iggy Lockheart, “the sixth youngster to disappear this year from Hanging Hill”.

Hanging Hill, alas, is a poor area where children tend to go missing on a regular basis without much police interest. But when a grieving mother tells Terry that “fancy people are taking our kids,” working-class Terry and her DCI partner Tamla Sioux – “the new kind [of cop] who had watched the movies you hadn’t seen and who probably had degrees in psychology and screenwriting” – sit down and take note.

What follows is a dark and hilarious adventure through contemporary Britain that uses detective fiction to confuse all manner of pretense and hypocrisy (Iggy Lockheart’s disappearance is overlooked due to the Queen’s upcoming royal visit ). A dark, irreverent and impressionistic take on detective procedurals reminiscent of Mick Herron’s Slough House and Keith Ridgway’s Hawthorn and Child novels, High John the Conqueror belatedly lays claim to the most original crime novel of the year.

Set in Argentina, the first novel by Paula Rodriguez urgent matters, translated by Sarah Moses (Pushkin Vertigo, £12.99) opens with a train wreck that proves a blessing in disguise for Hugo Victor Lamadrid, a petty criminal who views his miraculous survival as an opportunity to escape a lifetime spent running at the request of her mother-in-law, Olga. Unfortunately, Hugo counted without the police inspector Dominguez, a phenomenally successful and relentless investigator even if – or perhaps because – “human relations are a mystery which escapes him”.

Written in the taut, crisp style of classic pulp noir, and proceeding through brief chapters that offer a variety of viewpoints – those of Hugo, his companion Marta and their daughter Evelyn, as well as those of Dominguez, Olga and Marta’s religious sister Monica – the story unfolds at a breakneck pace as Hugo moves from hope to despair to dreams of an unlikely redemption that he probably would have given up at first if he had taken the time to listen to his sister-in-law, Monica: “Salvation is not free. Someone must suffer the injuries. God doesn’t save you like that, because salvation is not a social plan.

Irish Criminal Correspondent of the Year in 2021, Michael O’Toole’s Black light (Maverick House, €16.99) is the hardest first Irish mystery novel in years. Operating out of Broadstone Garda station, John Lazarus is an Italian-Irish detective who specializes in investigating sex crimes, partly as a self-imposed penance for failing to prevent the rape and murder of his beloved sister. Gabriella a few years ago.

When student Anne Delaney is raped and left for dead after a brutal assault, Lazarus takes the call and soon comes face to face with Ireland’s most charismatic crime reporter, Conor Sullivan, who seems to have an uncanny knowledge of details of the attack. Lazarus is an irritating and self-aggrandizing character at times – he describes himself, without irony, as “dark and brooding” and “an Irish Al Pacino” – but overall, Black Light is an incredibly gritty start, thanks in large part to to O’Toole’s knowledge. of the grim realities of Irish policing and detective journalism.

  • Declan Burke is an author and journalist. His current novel is The Lammisters (No Alibis Press)
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A new ionizable branched lipid dramatically increases the efficiency of mRNA delivery https://i-racconti.com/a-new-ionizable-branched-lipid-dramatically-increases-the-efficiency-of-mrna-delivery/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 05:36:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/a-new-ionizable-branched-lipid-dramatically-increases-the-efficiency-of-mrna-delivery/ Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are biological molecules that transfer information encoded by genes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for protein synthesis by ribosomes. mRNA sequences can be designed to code for specific proteins; the best-known example of this are mRNA vaccines for COVID-19. mRNA molecules are large and chemically unstable, so a vector must be […]]]>

Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are biological molecules that transfer information encoded by genes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm for protein synthesis by ribosomes. mRNA sequences can be designed to code for specific proteins; the best-known example of this are mRNA vaccines for COVID-19. mRNA molecules are large and chemically unstable, so a vector must be used to deliver mRNA to cells. One of the most advanced technologies for mRNA delivery are lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), which are composed of ionizable lipids, cholesterol, helper lipids, and polyethylene glycol.

A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Yusuke Sato and Professor Hideyoshi Harashima of Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Kazuki Hashiba of Nitto Denko Corporation have developed a new branched ionizable lipid that, when ‘It is included in NLPs, greatly increases the efficiency of mRNA delivery. Their results were published in the journal Little Science.

Previous work has shown that ionizable lipids with branched tails increase the efficiency of mRNA delivery by LNPs. However, two major issues have prevented a systematic analysis of the branching effect of ionizable lipids. First, tail branching leads to a huge diversity of chemicals; second, the number of commercially available branched ionizable lipids is limited. To overcome these obstacles, the researchers generated a systematic lipid library of branched ionizable lipids and limited this library to a specific subset of branched lipids that could be described with just two parameters: total carbon number and symmetry. They then tested the 32 lipids in this library for their effect on the stability of LNPs containing mRNA (LNP-RNA).

The team found that RNA-LNPs that contained highly symmetric branched lipids exhibited greater microviscosity, and that higher microviscosity was positively correlated with increased stability of RNA-LNPs in storage. Highly symmetric branched lipids in RNA-LNPs are also positively correlated with protein expression in liver and spleen in mice. They determined that branch chain length affects organ selectivity.

The most stable storage and efficient delivery of mRNA was achieved by the branched lipid CL4F 8-6. The authors demonstrated that this particular lipid could be used in LNPs designed for gene editing, achieving a 77% deletion of the target gene in mice with a single dose of LNP.

This study revealed that branched lipids with a high level of symmetry contribute to optimal LNP properties for efficient intracellular delivery and stable formulations. Future work will focus on the development of expanded lipid libraries to understand the properties of other branched lipids and may lead to the design of novel lipids.

Source:

Journal reference:

Hashiba, K. et al. (2022) Branching of ionizable lipids can improve mRNA stability, fusogenicity, and functional delivery. Little Science. doi.org/10.1002/smsc.202200071.

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JA Bayona Brings a Spanish Civil War Book Classic to the Big Screen https://i-racconti.com/ja-bayona-brings-a-spanish-civil-war-book-classic-to-the-big-screen/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 20:33:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/ja-bayona-brings-a-spanish-civil-war-book-classic-to-the-big-screen/ spain J.A. Bayonadirector of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” and two episodes of “The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power”, develops an adaptation of Manuel Chaves Nogales’ collection of short stories “A sangre y fuego”, now considered by some in Spain to be the best representation by a Spaniard of his terrible Spanish Civil […]]]>

spain J.A. Bayonadirector of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” and two episodes of “The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power”, develops an adaptation of Manuel Chaves Nogales’ collection of short stories “A sangre y fuego”, now considered by some in Spain to be the best representation by a Spaniard of his terrible Spanish Civil War.

Bayona is working with writer-director Agustín Díaz Yanes (“Alatriste”, “Gold”, “Don’t Tempt Me”) to develop a screenplay based on the book by Chaves Nogales, who died in exile in London in 1944.

Speak on stage Seville European Film Festivalwhich opened on Friday, Bayona said he had been developing the project for several years and was “particularly interested in the humanistic vision” that Chaves Nogales showed in the fictional book.

Written from 1936 to 1937 by Chaves Nogales in reaction to what he called “the stupidity and cruelty that reigned over Spain” during the Spanish Civil War, practiced by both the far right and the far left, “A sangre y fuego” includes nine different stories. .

They range from a tale of Republican executions in a Madrid bombarded by the forces of Franco and his fascist allies to an Andalusian marquis who sets out to drive out the Communists with his personal death squad to a militiawoman who saves the life of a compassionate right-wing lawyer.

Although fictional, all stories are based on real events, writes Chaves Nogales in a preface.

Bayona told Seville he had been in contact with the writer’s family for some time and had met the writer’s daughter, Pilar, who died in 2021 aged 101 . She gave the director her important testimony and other information. for the project.

The director spoke at the festival with the Spanish journalist Gerardo Sánchez, director of the program La 2 Días de Cine and Charo Ramos, journalist and coordinator of the cycle.

Turning her attention to her directing career, Bayona said, “When I was very young, there were TV series about Hitchcock or Truffaut or Kurosawa or Spielberg. And I liked them anyway, they were auteur films, and they were accessible films,” a description that could be applied to his own films.

He added: “Watching started to make me realize that I was much less interested in reality than in cinema, and around it I articulated my reality, I found a refuge. I don’t remember not a moment when I decided to become a director. He was always there, it was a total vocation.

Bayona started her career in music videos. “It was a school for me. I’ve always been fascinated by Spielberg and Polanski, directors who practically tackle a different genre in each of their films. So I saw in the clips an opportunity to make my own little films.

Bayona is currently working on the post-production of the feature film “Society of the Snow”, based on the book of the same name by Pablo Vierci. The film, shot in Spanish, tells the story of Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571, which crashed into a glacier in the Andes in 1972. The book tells the story of the 16 survivors on board.

The film marks Bayona’s return to Spanish-language cinema for the first time in 16 years since her 2006 feature debut, “The Orphanage,” a big hit at the Cannes Film Festival that year.

John Hopewell contributed to this article.

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Women publish an adventure novel | Culture & Leisure https://i-racconti.com/women-publish-an-adventure-novel-culture-leisure/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/women-publish-an-adventure-novel-culture-leisure/ The close friendship of three Newport women – Carla Perry, Sara Lou Heimlich and Jess Bondy – led to the publication of their first novel, filled with adventure and romance, and laced with real life challenges. The trio of writers behind “The Jew Girls Adventure Series: You Can Call Me Andy” have been friends for […]]]>

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the power of words in a search for love https://i-racconti.com/the-power-of-words-in-a-search-for-love/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 21:40:10 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-power-of-words-in-a-search-for-love/ I’m old enough to remember the days when you were referred to the card catalog to find a book at the local library. Often housed in vintage wooden crates and packed tightly together, these typed – and sometimes handwritten – cards bore series of numbers, titles, authors and brief descriptions of tidy books to be […]]]>

I’m old enough to remember the days when you were referred to the card catalog to find a book at the local library.

Often housed in vintage wooden crates and packed tightly together, these typed – and sometimes handwritten – cards bore series of numbers, titles, authors and brief descriptions of tidy books to be found in the maze. of thousands of books, all carefully cataloged and each in its place.

Books play an important role in author Celeste Ng’s latest novel, “Our Missing Hearts: A Novel.” His characters are influenced by ideas and words.

In search of the truth

Twelve-year-old Bird Gardner lives a quiet existence with his father, a former linguist who works in the college library and tidies up books. Bird knows his Chinese-American mother was a poet, but he doesn’t know about her work and doesn’t care, as she was lost to them when he was 9 years old.

The novel has a dystopian side. The Gardners’ world is riddled with fear. Bird doesn’t ask many questions and doesn’t get out of the way. Laws written to preserve American culture and encourage patriotism target Asian Americans. Libraries were forced to remove questionable titles, including works by his mother. Under the guise of quelling violence and restoring economic security, authorities are allowed to relocate the children of identified dissidents.

Bird does not know what happened to his mother, and his apparently broken-hearted father disavows his relationship with them. Then a mysterious letter arrives, a letter filled with enigmatic drawings of cats and a small wardrobe. What does all this mean?

The letter serves as a creative catalyst for the young adventurer. He decides to go in search of his mother, to go on a quest to unravel the mystery of her disappearance. With every clue he uncovers, his mind and heart open to the many folk tales and stories she infused into his memory as a young child. He begins to know his mind and his soul. He yearns for her unconditional love and warmth to come back into his life.

Author Celeste Ng at the 2018 National Book Festival. (Avery Jensen/CC BY-SA 4.0)

Charismatic characters

The story begins with Bird, this young boy who has lost his mother and decides to find her. Along the way, the reader will learn about his mother, Margaret, who was forced to leave her husband and child, and how her poetry empowered a movement. Readers will also meet his father, who is sworn to secrecy but pledged to protect his son. And then there are myriad friendships whose separate lives weave their own stories and intertwine with those of the main protagonists. One such character is Sadie, Bird’s best friend. She also disappeared, possibly as one of the displaced children.

During his journey, Bird discovers an underground network of librarians. He finds temporary refuge and respite with them, and they aid him in his quest to find his mother, and perhaps find his friend.

The power to make loving and effective choices is explored as a major theme: Bird’s choice is to leave the safety of his protected life in search of his mother; Margaret’s choice to leave first and then reconnect with her son, knowing the inherent risks of both given the chaotic climate of their time.

Ng plays with ironies in a world where a supposedly civilized community ignores blatant wrongs; the best preserved virtues are lost to paranoid ideologies. Readers will learn of Margaret’s defiant and desperate act to make a difference in a world out of whack in terms of humanity. Will this be the end or the beginning of an essential change? This novel is set in a broken world, but the characters are fighters in their own way. They carry their own shields and weapons. The human spirit survives and triumphs.

The essence of art and its powers and limits of influence is another theme in Ng’s story. Undoubtedly, this novel, like the poetry created by Margaret, is intended to influence and make readers think and reflect on the nature of change with all its consequences.

At the heart of this captivating novel, with its complex characters and poignant plot, is the ultimate, unbreakable bond between mother and child. Ng dives into the powerful and often heartbreaking ropes that can bring two together or tear them apart to leave them hanging. Life lessons are to be learned. Legacies are to be left. What do we pass on to our children?

It’s a suspenseful page turner. It’s part mystery, part love story, and part dystopia mixed with politics and philosophy. It’s about the power of words.

The story is cleverly crafted, compassionate and, at times, unforgiving in its harshness and injustice. The various plots connect completely convincingly with memorable and magical twists.

Readers will want to know what happens to all of these characters, especially the young boy and his mother. Both are on their own quests. It’s about how our hearts stay intact throughout the journey.

Epoch Times Photo
Books play an important role in author Celeste Ng’s latest novel, “Our Missing Hearts: A Novel.” His characters are influenced by ideas and words. (PenguinPress)

“Our Lost Hearts: A Novel”
By Celeste Ng
Penguin Press, October 4, 2022
Hardcover: 352 pages

Anita L. Sherman

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Anita L. Sherman is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience as a writer and editor for local newspapers and regional publications in Virginia. She now works as a freelance writer and is working on her first novel. She is the mother of three grown children and grandmother of four, and resides in Warrenton, Virginia. She can be contacted at anitajustwrite@gmail.com

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The Horror Begins at Home: The Haunting New Chapter of Domestic Noir | Fiction https://i-racconti.com/the-horror-begins-at-home-the-haunting-new-chapter-of-domestic-noir-fiction/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-horror-begins-at-home-the-haunting-new-chapter-of-domestic-noir-fiction/ Ohen Dee walks through the front door in Catriona Ward’s recent thriller The Last House on Needless Street, readers of gothic fiction find themselves in a familiar place. The house is “an underground world; a deep cave where lone rays of light fall on strange mounds, jagged broken things. Plywood is nailed to all the […]]]>

Ohen Dee walks through the front door in Catriona Ward’s recent thriller The Last House on Needless Street, readers of gothic fiction find themselves in a familiar place. The house is “an underground world; a deep cave where lone rays of light fall on strange mounds, jagged broken things. Plywood is nailed to all the windows,” and “the whole place smells of death; not rot or blood, but dry bones and dust; like an old, long-forgotten grave.

Dee investigates the disappearance of her younger sister Lulu 11 years earlier, and the lead leads her to Ted Bannerman, a strange loner who lives at the edge of the woods with his cat Olivia, and the occasional daughter, Lauren. Hiding nearby, Dee hears scratching and scratching through the walls; late at night, she sees a face at her window, “eyes shining like lamps, filled with the light of death”; the undergrowth of her terrifying neighbor seems to be writhing with serpents: “she sees them everywhere, their shaded rings”. But are these visions real or are they the product of Dee’s troubled mind – and what exactly are the horrors that haunt Ted’s house?

Ward is one of many novelists to explore new territory in gothic fiction, although the haunted house has long been a source of fascination and fear. From Henry James’ governess in The Turn of the Screw (1898) to Shirley Jackson’s timid Eleanor Vance in her 1959 classic The Haunting of Hill House, recently adapted for Netflix, these stories have often relied on unreliable narrators. , usually women, whose psychological issues and struggles with loneliness color their perceptions of the danger around them. Stephen King called these works “the only two great supernatural novels of the last hundred years”, but it was his son, fellow horror novelist Joe Hill, who pinpointed the reason: because “the houses are not haunted”. – people are”.

Tuppence Middleton and Martin Compston in the TV adaptation of Louise Candlish’s novel Our House. Photography: Jon Ford (Specials) Laurence Cendowicz/ITV

Hill House appears to Eleanor “vile”, “sick”; guests gathered to witness the supernatural powers of the ancient mansion are tormented by the nightly pounding, deadly cold, and wild laughter in the hallways. Yet when Eleanor’s name appears on the walls – a chilling device echoed in Sarah Waters’ 2009 gothic novel The Little Stranger – Eleanor is accused of writing it herself. Increasingly, readers — and even Eleanor herself — are beginning to wonder how much of the action is “in her head as much as in the room.” As in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s 1892 short story The Yellow Wallpaper, whose narrator is confined to a single room with walls that seem to move, twist and come to life at night, Eleanor’s mental state deteriorates. intertwines with that of the house, until she feels that “whatever he wants from me, he can have”.

Gilman’s narrator suffers from what we would now call postnatal depression, and her physician husband prescribes bed rest and no stimuli, which means no reading or writing, and hours of staring. the peeling wallpaper of the old nursery until she is convinced that she is possessed. : “And the worst in the moonlight, it becomes bars! The outer pattern, I mean, and the woman behind it, it’s as simple as it gets. Imprisoned in the domestic realm, as Eleanor was also when caring for her elderly mother, it’s no surprise that these female protagonists see danger in the buildings around them. As Erin Kelly, author of the recent gothic thriller The Skeleton Key, puts it, “natural reactions to coercive or abusive behavior can easily be called ‘madness.’ And the home has traditionally been a place – often the only place – of female agency.

Henry James Turn of the Nut

In my novel, The People Before, gallery fundraiser Jess finds herself locked in an old, dilapidated house when she quits her job and moves with her young family to rural Suffolk. Cut off from her former colleagues and friends, and isolated from neighbors who are suspicious of the London family who have taken over this notorious local property, Jess feels nervous, watched – at night she is convinced that a stranger is hiding, just out of sight. Are these premonitions or is his mind playing tricks? In The Skeleton Key, Nell is persuaded to return to the family home in London, to celebrate her father’s legendary birthday. treasure hunt book, is strewn with pitfalls. The house holds secrets, and the tension of the novel lies in whether Nell will discover their true source in time.

Catriona Ward's last home on Useless Street

Homes have played a central role in many recent thrillers, as a new genre of domestic noir has emerged over the past decade as writers explore fears of ownership, the breakdown of family and marital discord. Louise Candlish’s recently televised 2018 novel Our House asked readers to put themselves in a nightmarish situation – returning from a trip to discover strangers moving into your beloved family home. Meanwhile, last year’s Abigail Dean thriller Girl A raised darker questions about how a home can hold the legacy of childhood trauma.

With echoes of Lisa Jewell’s 2019 hit The Family Upstairs, Dean’s novel explores what happens to a group of siblings who flee their abusive parents and upbringing in a “house of horrors.” In both novels, the childhood home functions as a lasting reminder of mental and physical pain. Dean’s protagonist, Lexie, must decide what to do with the home in the moors that she and her siblings have been bequeathed. The horror is all too real, and yet Lexie’s quest to reconcile with the youth she spent years trying to escape from is haunted by the ghosts of her past.

Ward’s protagonist is also haunted by memories of the day her sister disappeared, and as the author guides us through the stories of Dee and her neighbor Ted, we discover that the real horror lingers not in the house. scary part of Needless Street, but inside the psyche of its inhabitants. The supernatural takes precedence over the psychological, and by the time the bigger twists are revealed, the reader might be more preoccupied with the things racing through the mind.

Charlotte Northedge is Co-Head of Books at The Guardian. Her second novel, The People Before, is published by HarperCollins. . To support the Guardian and Observer, order your copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.

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