Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://i-racconti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Fiction Book – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ 32 32 A new novel imagines the Marches as black women. https://i-racconti.com/a-new-novel-imagines-the-marches-as-black-women/ https://i-racconti.com/a-new-novel-imagines-the-marches-as-black-women/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 21:42:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/a-new-novel-imagines-the-marches-as-black-women/ The principle of the series is deceptively simple: what if the protagonists of classic literary works like Treasure island, The Wuthering Heights, and Robin Hood weren’t white? In April 2020, Feiwel and Friends, a young adult subdivision of Macmillan, announced the launch of a new project called Classics remixed. According to Publishers Weekly, the idea […]]]>

The principle of the series is deceptively simple: what if the protagonists of classic literary works like Treasure island, The Wuthering Heights, and Robin Hood weren’t white? In April 2020, Feiwel and Friends, a young adult subdivision of Macmillan, announced the launch of a new project called Classics remixed. According to Publishers Weekly, the idea came from a Twitter thread where New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie pondered how Batman would be different if Bruce Wayne was black. It is important to note that Bouie noted that “you could just [Batman] and that’s it, but I think there’s a real opportunity to reimagine the character as a black American, and how race shapes his past and the circumstances of his vigilante career.

The second title in the Remixed Classics series, a reimagining of Little woman by Bethany C. Morrow in which the March family is black, seizes this opportunity and runs with it. (The first title, A shock of steel, is a redesign of Treasure island which takes place in the South China Sea.)

So many beginnings may have been marketed as a remix of Little woman, but if we stick to the musical terminology, it might be more accurate to say that Morrow samples the Louisa May Alcott classic. Like the original novel, So many beginnings takes place during the Civil War and follows the trials and hardships of the March family. There are four sisters: Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy. Anyone who has read Alcott’s book or seen any of the film versions will recognize the outlines. Margaret’s greatest ambition is to start a family of her own. Joanne wants to be a writer. Bethlehem wants little more than to help others. Amethyst is the pampered young artist of the group, although in So many beginnings she dances rather than paints. And they all adore their mothers (Morrow’s version is called Mammy rather than Marmee). March’s patriarch is absent, leaving the women to fend for themselves.

But that’s about where the similarities end. The original White Marches, living in Concord, Massachusetts, struggle primarily against the boundaries of genteel poverty in the absence of their primary breadwinner. The Steps of Morrow face something entirely different. Immediately after Abraham Lincoln’s proclamation of emancipation, the Marches settled in a freedoms colony on Roanoke Island, along the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Deemed at the time as “smuggling camps” by the Union, the history of settlements and villages like Roanoke during the Civil War era has been largely unexplored in non-fiction, let alone. in fiction. “Word smuggling meant that even the soldiers and officers whose recent victories had won their freedom did not regard them as persons, ”writes Morrow. “Blacks were spoils of war, if they were more than a nuisance, and their greatest value was not being available to serve the Confederacy.” In the Union’s imagination, the Marches and their neighbors in Roanoke are not so much liberated people as confiscated goods. They are technically free, and while this freedom is dearly cherished, it also comes with conditions. It is these conditions that So many beginnings is largely concerned with – while each of the March sisters eventually leave Roanoke, the majority of the book takes place in the years when they all live under one roof.

Similar to Little woman, So many beginnings is mainly carried by vignettes focusing on each of the sisters who establish their personalities and individual orientations towards what they describe as their “second life”. The novel begins with a visit to the Marches by a journalist from the North by the name of Joseph Williams who, unlike the family, was born free. Morrow is at his strongest when she details the tension inherent in the relationships formed and necessitated by the period. His portrayal of Williams’ relative ignorance when he impetuously calls on recently freed slaves to view the war effort as their fight is also evocative, as is Mammy’s response: “You have to understand that we who needed this. war to become free know that this is our fight, whether we see the battle on the field or just every day. Describing the paternalism of a young white missionary who takes an interest in the Marches when Beth falls ill, Morrow writes that “Beth – and indeed all black people – had seen the kind of loving care that made her plans or animals. company, and anyway. , they were less than autonomous people, and as they were always expected to perform.

Yet sometimes the book is subject to the weight of education rather than entertainment. It’s a strain familiar to readers of historical romance novels written by and about black women. (This is a strain familiar also to readers of Alcott’s Little woman, including the message to 21st century smacks of Christian piety.) In many ways, it is up to the March family to rectify the ignorance of their contemporaries, whether they are the young missionary or a black patron from the North who wants Jo to write his tale of slave in a more “authentic” tone. The pressure to educate means that the sibling resentment that has sometimes stained Alcott’s novel is absent from Morrow’s. There’s no burning Jo’s book or negating Meg’s ambitions to get married. The Marches rarely fight, which means that So many beginnings doesn’t quite capture the sometimes tense nature of the siblings as well as Alcott’s original.

That doesn’t mean Morrow’s version isn’t without charm. She manages to fully appropriate a familiar story, and the rationale for omitting these parts of the story ultimately makes sense in its new context. Longing for marriage and motherhood means something quite different for a black woman less than a year old from an institution that cared little about separating children from their mothers and wives from their husbands, if they did. allowed to get married. And Jo’s writing career doesn’t just take into account the black tradition of oral storytelling, it depends almost entirely on her desire to be of service to her community in Roanoke. It wouldn’t make sense for her younger sister to try to sabotage this.

Yes, the names of the characters may be the same, but their stories are theirs and in some ways make Alcott’s version more satisfying. Unlike Jo d’Alcott, Morrow doesn’t end up with a random German teacher and although she finishes the romance single, she is still in a deeply committed relationship. One of the most beautiful parts of the book comes to the end when Jo finally confesses that she likes Laurie’s version of Morrow.

“I’m just scared,” Jo started, and her eyes fell. “That I don’t like like so many others do. And that I keep you of a better kind.

When she turned around, there was moisture in Lorie’s eyes.

“No,” he said.

“No?” she echoed, smirking and mimicking the nod. “That’s it?”

– That’s all, Jo, said Lorie, never breaking her gaze. “There is no better genre.”

It is a powerful affirmation of the many types of love, platonic and otherwise, that make up a busy life.

So many beginnings and the concept of racebending in general presents an interesting intellectual exercise, which makes readers wonder how much the supposed universality of a source text, especially a classic, relates to the whiteness of its typeface. How far do you have to bend something not before it breaks, but before it becomes something completely different? This is not to disparage Alcott’s version – I went so far as to read and like Little woman and its suites, which follow Jo’s exploits at the head of a boarding school for boys. But our favorite things always come out stronger after standing up to questioning, and while Morrow transmutes Alcott’s beloved classic the most, she isn’t the first to tinker with it. Greta Gerwig’s 2019 film adaptation sparked a heated debate around her likeable portrayal of Amy and her ambiguous ending. As for the modern 2018 account of Little woman, all I will say is that it exists and Lucas Grabeel from Musical High School is in the cast.

Audiences often think of adaptations to be the same, comparing and contrasting the new with the old to find the differences, often mistaking the more faithful adaptation for the better. But what tomorrow So many beginnings shows that variations on a theme, even significant ones, are not betrayals of the source material. Maybe we can stop thinking about a worthy adaptation as the original’s twin and more as a sister.



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Beasts and Baseball: New Science Fiction and Fantasy https://i-racconti.com/beasts-and-baseball-new-science-fiction-and-fantasy/ https://i-racconti.com/beasts-and-baseball-new-science-fiction-and-fantasy/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 09:00:08 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/beasts-and-baseball-new-science-fiction-and-fantasy/ Lincoln Michel’s first novel, THE SCOUT CORPS (Orbite, 356 p., $ 27), mixes black, cyberpunk and sport into something both timeless and original. In the near and troubling future of New York City, where extreme climate change has made limbs cybernetic and genetic modifications – called “upgrades” – necessary and mundane, steep income inequalities and […]]]>

Lincoln Michel’s first novel, THE SCOUT CORPS (Orbite, 356 p., $ 27), mixes black, cyberpunk and sport into something both timeless and original. In the near and troubling future of New York City, where extreme climate change has made limbs cybernetic and genetic modifications – called “upgrades” – necessary and mundane, steep income inequalities and horrific medical debt are on the rise. more widespread. But the book doesn’t really talk about these things. First and foremost, it’s about baseball.

Kobo is a scout in a world where baseball teams are mostly owned by giant pharmaceutical companies. In addition to gamers, it recruits scientists, geneticists, and neurosurgeons who help shape gamers into concept demonstrations of their latest genetic therapies. Kobo’s foster brother JJ Zunz is the flagship puncher for the Monsanto Mets, who have placed their hopes in him for the pennant. But during the playoffs, Zunz steps up and dies a gruesome, baffling, and widely televised death. Kobo, devastated, thinks it is a murder and is recruited by the Mets to investigate. He makes his way through the hidden paths in the life of his famous brother, even as he is tracked down by medical loan sharks who try to take back parts of his body.

Kobo’s love and sorrow for his brother drives every page, and the true gravity of those feelings exists in affecting the contrast to the casual, corporatized dystopia he inhabits. Michel’s writing is gorgeous too, infusing current genre types with sophisticated life and illuminating vast swathes of history with the occasional world-building flick. “The Body Scout” is a crazy race, sad and funny, surreal and intelligent.

Ryka aoki THE LIGHT OF UNCOMMON STARS (Tor, 372 pp., $ 25.99) Also mixes genres, but in a haphazard way, with results ranging from surprisingly delicious to incomplete frustrating. In this love letter to music, food, and the San Gabriel Valley in California, Christian demons clash with aliens over the souls of a famous violin teacher and his talented student.

Shizuka Satomi trained six brilliant violinists to career peaks before returning their souls to hell in the fulfillment of his own hellish contract; she is looking for a seventh and final student to pay off her debt. Katrina Nguyen is a young transgender woman on the run from her abusive family, trying to make ends meet with a cheap violin and the occasional prostitution. Lan Tran is a mother, a spaceship captain, and the owner of a donut shop, protecting her family from alien refugees from the Galactic Empire by posing as human refugees. Their paths cross and get tangled up near a duck pond in El Molino Park: Shizuka and Lan start dating, and Katrina agrees to become Shizuka’s student.

There is a lot to enjoy here. Much recent science fiction and fantasy have modeled gender diversity in ambitious ways, building worlds where transgender and non-binary identities are accepted and expected. Rather, Aoki bases his novel on the real-world hardships transgender people endure. Katrina lives in poverty, dysphoria and suicidal ideation; she always braces for abuse and falls in relief when she meets cuteness instead. Her love of music is a lifeline that carries her through a vibrant Los Angeles of good sounds and rich scents, fusion foods and immigrant bloodlines contrasting with the elite and rarefied circles of international violin competitions.

That said, just as Katrina’s big heart and immense talent collides with the limits of her novice technique, so does the construction of this book. Frequent dizzying changes of point of view – sometimes every few sentences – make the writing seem like always pausing; there is such a cavalcade of characters and concerns that many of them get overlooked, with some storylines and dynamics feeling rushed while others feeling strained and repetitive. These tempo and technique issues are frustrating – but the book made me cry in spite of them, and bursts with love and ideas about food, music, legacy and transformation.

Cadwell Turnbull NO GODS, NO MONSTERS (Blackstone, 387 pp., $ 26.99) is a complex sequence of intimate and moving character portraits before and after an event called the Fracture, when a pack of werewolves deliberately reveal themselves to the public. As other so-called monsters emerge from the shadows, fronts emerge in a war between secret societies, witnessed by a mysterious narrator who glides from place to place and from life to life in his sleep. .

The depth and care with which Turnbull inhabits each character is fascinating; despite an extensive cast spread over a wide area, I never felt lost or confused. Her attention to location detail is thoughtful and clear: the story spans from Massachusetts to St. Thomas to Virginia with confident ease, carried by beautiful conversational prose that’s surprisingly punctuated with reminders of who’s telling the stories – and How? ‘Or’ What.

Finishing a book without knowing it’s the first of a trilogy is a bit like looking down after chasing the Roadrunner off a cliff. In retrospect, I can appreciate how well Turnbull grounded that sprawling first act; at the time, I was struggling helplessly. I hope I spared you this, and you can let yourself be immersed in this tender and fierce book like your hands in the keys of the piano, or your teeth in the flesh.


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FSU confirms the theft of nearly 5,000 rare sci-fi and comic book items https://i-racconti.com/fsu-confirms-the-theft-of-nearly-5000-rare-sci-fi-and-comic-book-items/ https://i-racconti.com/fsu-confirms-the-theft-of-nearly-5000-rare-sci-fi-and-comic-book-items/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 22:18:45 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/fsu-confirms-the-theft-of-nearly-5000-rare-sci-fi-and-comic-book-items/ The Florida State University Libraries has a real thriller on his hands. Between March 17, 2020 and February 10, someone stole nearly 5,000 items from the Robert M. Ervin Jr. Collection hosted by FSU Special Collections & Archives at Strozier Library, the university confirmed on Friday. A total of 4,996 items are missing from the […]]]>

The Florida State University Libraries has a real thriller on his hands.

Between March 17, 2020 and February 10, someone stole nearly 5,000 items from the Robert M. Ervin Jr. Collection hosted by FSU Special Collections & Archives at Strozier Library, the university confirmed on Friday.

A total of 4,996 items are missing from the collection, which consists of comics and series on superheroes, science fiction, fantasy and horror, the university said in an email to the Democrat.

Over 1,200 serial titles are featured, mostly from the 1950s to the 1970s. Publications include those of Marvel Comics, DC Comics, underground publishers, foreign language titles and pulp magazines.

According to one list, the collection includes:

  • Avengers # 068 Publisher: Marvel Comic Group
  • Avengers # 069 Publisher: Marvel Comic Group
  • Avengers # 070 Publisher: Marvel Comic Group
  • Avengers # 071 Publisher: Marvel Comic Group
  • Avengers # 072 Publisher: Marvel Comic Group
  • 80 pages. Giant – Batman (Silver Anniversary Issue) # 5 Publisher: National Periodical Publications
  • 80 pages. Giant – Batman # 12 Publisher: National Periodical Publications
  • 80 pages. Giant – Jimmy Olsen # 13 Publisher: National Periodical Publications
  • 80 pages. Giant – Jimmy Olsen # 2 Publisher: National Periodical Publications
  • 80 pages. Giant – Lois Lane # 14 Publisher: National Periodical Publications


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Chronicles of a new exploratory fictional novel Life in a world without humanity https://i-racconti.com/chronicles-of-a-new-exploratory-fictional-novel-life-in-a-world-without-humanity/ https://i-racconti.com/chronicles-of-a-new-exploratory-fictional-novel-life-in-a-world-without-humanity/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:40:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/chronicles-of-a-new-exploratory-fictional-novel-life-in-a-world-without-humanity/ Author Beverly Nimke presents her captivating and futuristic new novel “In a Village of Dolls” DALLAS, September 20, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – There are many books about humanity, but few offer solutions that have inspired the author and empowerment scholar. beverly nimke reflect and create a fictitious world where humanity no longer exists. In […]]]>

Author Beverly Nimke presents her captivating and futuristic new novel “In a Village of Dolls”

DALLAS, September 20, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – There are many books about humanity, but few offer solutions that have inspired the author and empowerment scholar. beverly nimke reflect and create a fictitious world where humanity no longer exists. In his new futuristic but realistic novel “In a village of dolls”, which takes place in Wales In 30 years, Nimke introduces readers to the 12-year-old main character Anne that takes readers on a journey that no one would ever want to endure.

“In a Village of Dolls” explores a world where people are born and live their entire lives without experiencing humanity and only a certain group of people know what it is like to be human to each other. others. Seen through the lens of Anne, readers are introduced to her world and her reality where no one cares and no one feels. Anne also deals with an abusive father who has no respect for life or for himself while his shy and scared mother, who loves Anne dearly, stand idly by. The story delves into the idea of ​​spiritual warfare as two communities begin to fight over the idea of ​​humanity, but neither provides a solution, that is, until Anne intervenes to understand it.

“We are currently waging our own battle against humanity in this world and no one is presenting solutions,” Nimke said. “I hope that through my story it will help teach and show people more about humanity from an organic approach.”

A reviewer recently said that Nimke’s story made them look inside themselves and see how they needed to change. As the first book in a planned trilogy, readers will be left on the edge of their seats as they share Anna’s captivating and heartbreaking journey for a better humanity for all while taking a deeper look at themselves.

“In a village of dolls”
Through beverly nimke
ISBN: 978-1-9822-7055-1 (sc); 978-1-9822-7056-8 (e)
Available via Amazon and Balboa press

About the Author
beverly nimke is an empowerment specialist who aims to help people not to cope but to live in harmony with themselves. She spent 25 years researching and studying humanity independently and discovered a wonderful secret in life. Nimke is also the author of “A Child’s Perspective of a gay parent, published by Balboa Press in december 2020. She currently resides in Mansfield, Texas. For more information, please visit http://www.looklocklistenlearn.com.

For interview and exam copy requests:
LAVIDGE Advertising,
Lauren Dickerson
ldickerson@lavidge.com
480-306-7117

Media contact

Lauren Dickerson, LAVIDGE, 480-998-2600, ldickerson@lavidge.com

SOURCE WASHBASIN


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Foundation Featurette reveals the difficulties of adapting Asimov’s book https://i-racconti.com/foundation-featurette-reveals-the-difficulties-of-adapting-asimovs-book/ https://i-racconti.com/foundation-featurette-reveals-the-difficulties-of-adapting-asimovs-book/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 21:57:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/foundation-featurette-reveals-the-difficulties-of-adapting-asimovs-book/ Apple TV + has released a new first look at the upcoming adaptation of Isaac Asimov’s epic masterpiece, Foundation. The series follows a group of scientists who set out to rebuild and preserve human knowledge after calculating the date of the end of civilization. In the new featurette, David Goyer sits down to discuss how […]]]>

Apple TV + has released a new first look at the upcoming adaptation of Isaac Asimov’s epic masterpiece, Foundation. The series follows a group of scientists who set out to rebuild and preserve human knowledge after calculating the date of the end of civilization.

In the new featurette, David Goyer sits down to discuss how the production has managed to stay true to the original novels and adapt them to the screen. A future of cast members also stepped in to share their thoughts on the series.

Foundation is the greatest science fiction work of all time, “Goyer said in the first look.” And it’s never been brought to the screen before. It was such a phenomenal influence on the Star wars universe. Even things like Dune were influenced by Foundation. “Isaac Asimov’s flagship work was first published in 1942 and has had a tremendous influence on every piece of science fiction consumed today.

Foundation_1

Image via Apple

RELATED: ‘Foundation’ First Trailer Reveals Epic Sci-Fi Series Coming To AppleTV

In 1998, New Line Cinema intended to adapt the series into a trilogy, but ended up adapting JRR Tolkien‘s The Lord of the Rings instead of. Apple is the first to embark on the adaptation of Foundation and this first look proves that they have spared no expense to create an impressive, high-quality series.

In addition to showrunner and executive producer Goyer, the series is produced for Apple by Skydance Television with Robyn asimov, Josh friedman, Cameron Welsh, David Ellison, Dana goldberg, and Marcy Ross also as executive producers.

Foundation stars Jared harris like Dr Hari Seldon, Lee pace like Brother Day, Lou llobell like Gaal Dornick, Lea Harvey like Salvor Hardin, Laura Birn like Demerzel, Terrence Mann as brother Dusk, Cassien Bilton as Brother Dawn, and Alfred Enoch like Raych.

The series arrives on Apple TV + starting September 24. Check out the new trailer below:

KEEP READING: “Foundation” release date, cast, episode details, and everything we know so far about the Apple TV + series


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Richard E. Grant on “Everybody’s Talking About Jamie,” How “RuPaul’s Drag Race” Helped Him Prepare for the Role and “Persuasion” of Jane Austen

He also reveals the one good thing that came out of his time doing “Hudson Hawk”.

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Book Review: Wiley Cash’s Fourth Novel “When Ghosts Come Home” Combines Rich Characters, Captivating Mystery https://i-racconti.com/book-review-wiley-cashs-fourth-novel-when-ghosts-come-home-combines-rich-characters-captivating-mystery/ https://i-racconti.com/book-review-wiley-cashs-fourth-novel-when-ghosts-come-home-combines-rich-characters-captivating-mystery/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 16:02:11 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/book-review-wiley-cashs-fourth-novel-when-ghosts-come-home-combines-rich-characters-captivating-mystery/ “WHEN GHOSTS COME HOME” by Wiley Cash (William Morrow, 304 pages, $ 29). Wiley Cash, author of “A Land More Kind Than Home”, “This Dark Road to Mercy” and “The Last Ballad”, returns with his latest offering, the warm and immensely readable “When Ghosts Come Home”. Set in 1984 in the small coastal town of […]]]>

“WHEN GHOSTS COME HOME” by Wiley Cash (William Morrow, 304 pages, $ 29).

Wiley Cash, author of “A Land More Kind Than Home”, “This Dark Road to Mercy” and “The Last Ballad”, returns with his latest offering, the warm and immensely readable “When Ghosts Come Home”.

Set in 1984 in the small coastal town of Oak Island, North Carolina, “When Ghosts Come Home” opens as a low-flying plane wakes 63-year-old Winston Barnes and his cancer-stricken wife, Marie. . Although Winston, the city’s principled and amiable sheriff, already has a peculiar feeling and tells his beloved Marie that he is heading to the airport to investigate, a phone call from the expedition alludes to to a possible plane crash, pushes him quickly to action.

When Sheriff Barnes arrives, he does indeed find a crashed and eerily empty plane, but the condition of the plane isn’t the only mystery the Sheriff has on his hands. Nearby, he discovers the body of Rodney Bellamy, a black man who is the son of a local high school history teacher and civil rights leader, shot dead. MPs and others soon to arrive on the scene are quick to link the two as the result of a drug case gone awry, but Sheriff Barnes is not so sure. He thinks something else could very well be happening on Oak Island – something involving people few others would ever suspect.

While “When Ghosts Come Home” is truly a detective story – a novel that demands (and provides) answers – readers should step into the book knowing that there is much more to these pages than a simple mystery to solve. It’s a character-rich book that also expertly weaves subplots dealing with politics, corruption, and racism.

More information

Author Appearance / Wiley Cash will discuss “When Ghosts Come Home” at the Southern Festival of Books Online 2021 at 4:15 p.m. CDT on October 9. Learn more about softestofbooks.org.

A lot of those subplots revolve around Sheriff Barnes as he tries to come to terms with his fading status in a city that looks like it wants to leave him behind for a new face in the next election. Barnes is a good, decent man – a man who, although he has a moment in his past that haunts him, actively tries to do what is right and right. If his opponent was like him, his downfall might not be so hard; however, his opponent, Bradley Frye, is nothing like him. Frye is arrogant and racist. Sheriff Barnes remembers him as “one of the local boys who loaded trucks to harass and beat up black students protesting just up the road in Wilmington.”

To fully show the separation between the two men, Cash writes: “Winston was more accustomed to arresting men like Bradley Frye for drunk driving or for arresting prostitutes than he had opposed them in the past. ‘an election.” Sheriff Barnes’ disappointment in seeing others backing up his outrageous challenger – and seeing him slowly begin to realize how dishonorable and cruel so many people around him are – is heartbreaking.

While Sheriff Barnes’ story is the soul of “When Ghosts Come Home,” two other narratives are equally central to the whole novel. The story of Colleen, the Barnes’ daughter trying to recover from an unhappy pregnancy, proves how difficult it can be to escape the ghosts that haunt us. Jay, a teenage Bellamy family member with his own troubling past, also offers a crucial and touching perspective on how racism is not something that only exists in the adult world, as he observes. how his close white friend Cody never goes inside Jay’s house, leaves their basketball games early to use his own bathroom, and even refuses a sip of water from Jay’s outside hose.

Cash writes in such accessible and fluid prose that it’s easy to get lost in his work. But style isn’t the only reason her latest novel is so all-consuming. It’s a topical novel that, while certainly dark, also asks us to believe in hope – in redemption. With “When Ghosts Come Home”, Cash offers the kind of book that many of us dream of.

For more local coverage of the books, visit Chapter16.org, an online publication from Humanities Tennessee.

Photo provided by Mallory Cash / Wiley Cash


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Like a good novel, The Yass Book Store gets off to a rough start https://i-racconti.com/like-a-good-novel-the-yass-book-store-gets-off-to-a-rough-start/ https://i-racconti.com/like-a-good-novel-the-yass-book-store-gets-off-to-a-rough-start/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 01:01:25 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/like-a-good-novel-the-yass-book-store-gets-off-to-a-rough-start/ Joanna Hicks couldn’t find an empty store on Yass Main Street to open her bookstore, so she moved further afield to her family’s former B&B. Photo: Sally Hopman. Joanna Hicks’ dream of opening her own boutique in Yass has all the makings of a great novel.The long wait for a store on the main street […]]]>

Joanna Hicks couldn’t find an empty store on Yass Main Street to open her bookstore, so she moved further afield to her family’s former B&B. Photo: Sally Hopman.

Joanna Hicks’ dream of opening her own boutique in Yass has all the makings of a great novel.The long wait for a store on the main street of the city to become available (it never has).

The first COVID-19 containment. Then the second on September 13.

But she was not to be put off. After all, aren’t bookstores full of drama?

Last weekend, Joanna finally opened The Yass Book Store for business. She had done a pop-up shop trial in August, but it mostly attracted family and friends, so she couldn’t wait to welcome the world.

Business was going well on the weekends. People came and it was a good start. But Monday at midnight, the city was again locked down.


READ ALSO: Online Shopping Helps Yass Valley Community Survive Lockdown


Joanna had to wait a while for this dream of opening a bookstore to come true. This is not just any old dream. The former civil servant and trained librarian wanted to give Yass something he hadn’t had in about 10 years: his own bookstore.

A place where people could meet, talk, hear about the latest publications, meet authors and other creative souls. It was also never going to be just another bookstore when it opened in the family’s old home, a former B&B called Minnie’s.

“I waited for a store to open up on Main Street, but that didn’t happen,” says Joanna.

So she chose to open the shop in the old B&B, still on the main street a little higher up the road towards the motorway.

The traditional little cottage is now The Yass Book Store, and it looks exactly what it is – a book lover’s home with books, stationery, prints and other rooms occupying most of the tables. and chairs inside. There are cookbooks in the kitchen, good bulky novels in the bedroom, and book walls in the living room with maps and pictures adorning the fireplace and most other flat surfaces.

Books in the kitchen at Yass Bookstore

Where else would you keep cookbooks other than in the kitchen? Photo: Sally Hopman.

Joanna has created a unique oasis in the old B&B, with each room decorated like a cozy country house, but all featuring books, prints, paper and maps all over the place.

Having books around her has always been a part of Joanna’s life.

“That’s what I wanted to create here,” she says. “Things like Kindles are good if you travel, but I think there are a lot of people like me who love having the physical book around them – books that you love so much that you want to read them again and Again.

“A book with a good story and good characters stays with you long after you finish it.

“I really think the concept will work in a place like Yass because there are so many creative people living here. It’s a wonderful niche area and I would love to show off what people are writing and doing here.

Joanna Hicks tidies up the library at Yass Bookstore

Joanna Hicks is adding the finishing touches to the shelves of what used to be the living room of her family’s former B&B and is now the Yass Bookstore. Photo: Sally Hopman.

This passion for reading and books didn’t happen overnight – she’s been with Joanna for as long as she can remember.

“I remember daddy read the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit when I was only eight or nine, ”she says. “I liked it. We even ended up calling our guinea pigs after certain characters.”

The opening of the Yass Bookstore is just the first part of Joanna’s story. She has already stocked books from local authors, but wants to expand that to include crafts, prints and stationery from local artists. She is also keen to organize readings and book launches, and to help promote skills associated with age-old occupations such as bookbinding.

This is, of course, the will of COVID-19. In the meantime, during confinement, Joanna has to be content with her news website and online shoppers.


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Southside writer launches novel based on his great-grandmother’s trip to the United States during the Mexican Revolution https://i-racconti.com/southside-writer-launches-novel-based-on-his-great-grandmothers-trip-to-the-united-states-during-the-mexican-revolution/ https://i-racconti.com/southside-writer-launches-novel-based-on-his-great-grandmothers-trip-to-the-united-states-during-the-mexican-revolution/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:21:10 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/southside-writer-launches-novel-based-on-his-great-grandmothers-trip-to-the-united-states-during-the-mexican-revolution/ San Antonio – – Editor’s Note: This story is Partnership With KSAT Live from the south side, New local and Latina property magazine He works to improve and expand community relationships by facilitating events, stories and businesses. Arda P. Dobbs is the author of the novel “Petra Luna’s Barefoot Dreams”. Born in a small town […]]]>

San Antonio – – Editor’s Note: This story is Partnership With KSAT Live from the south side, New local and Latina property magazine He works to improve and expand community relationships by facilitating events, stories and businesses.

Arda P. Dobbs is the author of the novel “Petra Luna’s Barefoot Dreams”. Born in a small town in northern Mexico, she moved to San Antonio and grew up on the South Side as a child.

After studying physics and working as an engineer, she continued her love for storytelling. As she writes, she is passionate about connecting children to their past, their communities, different cultures and nature. She lives outside of Houston with her husband and two children.

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When Dobbs was young, his great-grandmother Juanita Martinez spoke about the Mexican Revolution.

When Martinez was nine, she escaped combat, revolutionary destruction, and federal danger, traversing harsh deserts, her father, two younger brothers and two cousins.

At the border, their entry into the United States was refused along with thousands of other refugees. Finally, with the collapse of the Feds, the door opened and Martinez and his family were admitted.

Dobbs never forgot history, and while thinking of writing an article about it, she embarked on a research journey, reading dozens of books on the Mexican Revolution and Mexican-American immigration. . .. She classified four major Texas newspapers from 1910, and after a few months of searching, she found an article telling the same story as her grandmother.

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The event happened in the early afternoon of October 6, 1913, and that’s exactly what her great-grandmother said. At that time, she decided to write a novel based on the story of her great-grandmother.

Arda P. Dobbs is the author of the novel “Petra Luna’s Barefoot Dreams”. (Live from Southside Magazine)

Released on Tuesday, September 14, Barefoot Dreams of Petra Luna tells the story of a dangerous journey across the border with the United States during the Mexican Revolution, which is just as relevant and tragic today.

That year is 1913. Petra Luna’s mother has passed away and her father has been dragged outside by a soldier. She swore to her father to take care of her grandmother, sister, brother and other family members.

They flee north through the arid desert in an attempt to find a safe port. And every night, exhausted, Luna thinks about her dreams, especially her long-held desire to learn to read and write. abuelita It calls for a barefoot dream, but it is “not meant to go far.” Luna refuses to give up on this dream. And through war, hunger and danger, she does nothing to keep her family safe.

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Celebrate the release of “Petralna’s Barefoot Dreams” by joining the launch at The Twig Book Shop from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm on Saturday September 18th.

This article was first published Live from the south side..

Do you know someone or something worthy of being covered in the news on the South Side? Please let us know at the prompt below.

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Copyright 2021-KSAT All rights reserved.

Southside writer launches novel based on his great-grandmother’s trip to the United States during the Mexican Revolution

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OPINION: Sally Rooney’s New Novel Serves To Reinforce Her Place Among The Greats https://i-racconti.com/opinion-sally-rooneys-new-novel-serves-to-reinforce-her-place-among-the-greats/ https://i-racconti.com/opinion-sally-rooneys-new-novel-serves-to-reinforce-her-place-among-the-greats/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 04:27:37 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/opinion-sally-rooneys-new-novel-serves-to-reinforce-her-place-among-the-greats/ “Beautiful World, Where Are You,” Sally Rooney’s third novel, is a wonderful display of skillful description and skillful storytelling. It’s safe to say that Rooney’s hit, “Normal People,” was not his last masterpiece; on the contrary, it was clearly just the start of his (hopefully) long and successful career. “Beautiful World” tells the story of […]]]>

“Beautiful World, Where Are You,” Sally Rooney’s third novel, is a wonderful display of skillful description and skillful storytelling. It’s safe to say that Rooney’s hit, “Normal People,” was not his last masterpiece; on the contrary, it was clearly just the start of his (hopefully) long and successful career.

“Beautiful World” tells the story of college best friends Alice Kelleher and Eileen Lydon in their early 30s; they live apart but stay connected by email and are forever bound by a lasting friendship. Of course, there are other characters, like the two women’s respective love interests, as well as Eileen’s chaotic sister, Lola, but Alice and Eileen are central to the novel.

I’d almost say giving Eileen and Alice separate novels could have been clever, but the way each character interacts is more than enough to convince me otherwise. A lifelong Irishwoman, Rooney has put her three books in or around Dublin. If you want my version of an enhanced reading experience read every line with an Irish accent – I promise that helps.

Rooney’s specialty is making the ordinary extraordinary. To achieve this effect, there are descriptions that at first glance seem nothing more than decorative. Upon closer inspection, you realize that without these descriptions you are simply reading a book instead of living in the world that Rooney created.

Although this technique is evident throughout Rooney’s catalog, I just noticed it while reading “Beautiful World”. Actions such as pouring a fruit crumble, removing the lid from a water bottle, and screwing said lid back on and turning sideways are just a few of the many examples I was able to pull from the book.

The reason this descriptive style is so important is that it challenges what English students like me have heard in all creative writing classes: if it doesn’t advance the plot, reject it. The point is, all of Rooney’s novels are completely character-driven. When people ask me what one of his books is about, the only correct answer I can give is life – life, relationships, and the world in general.

Perhaps one of the most impressive aspects of Rooney’s work is the way she writes intimate scenes. Often times, especially in books, these can come across as gratuitous and even rude. However, because Rooney weaves these simple actions that slow down the moment, any sexual intimacy shown is graceful and real. Sadly, realistic representations of women in the realm of sex and intimacy are hard to find in mainstream fiction, but Rooney showed it.

No other author has been able to capture, scene by scene, such a precise representation of modern life for the young woman as Rooney. This skill is due in part to the fact that she is only 30 years old herself. I suspect that the experiences of Alice (a famous novelist) and Eileen (a literary magazine editor) are heavily influenced by her own, which only propels the credibility of this book even higher.

Rooney’s complete command of the English language allowed him to showcase beauty in simplicity, of which there is a lot in “Beautiful Word”. I found this book so incredibly easy to read; it is not due to the lack of complex themes, ideas or vocabulary. Rather, it is the way the pages flow – the way thoughts become actions become thoughts again. Every line, tedious as it may sound, is written with intention and art so that we as readers can peruse the book as if we were watching a movie.

Emma Trevino is the cultural editor of the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @itsemmatr


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Louis Menand among the nominees for the National Book Award https://i-racconti.com/louis-menand-among-the-nominees-for-the-national-book-award/ https://i-racconti.com/louis-menand-among-the-nominees-for-the-national-book-award/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 19:45:47 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/louis-menand-among-the-nominees-for-the-national-book-award/ NEW YORK (AP) – Louis Menand’s Cold War cultural history “The Free World” and Hanif Abdurraqib’s meditation on black art “A Little Devil in America” are among the works on the no list. -fiction for the National Book Awards. The National Book Foundation also announced the long list of poetry on Thursday, with nominees including […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Louis Menand’s Cold War cultural history “The Free World” and Hanif Abdurraqib’s meditation on black art “A Little Devil in America” are among the works on the no list. -fiction for the National Book Awards.

The National Book Foundation also announced the long list of poetry on Thursday, with nominees including “Sho” by Douglas Kearney, “A Thousand Times You Lose Your Treasure” by Hoa Nguyen and “Twice Alive” by Forrest Gander. The foundation has already published 10 lists for children’s literature and translation and will publish the list of fictions on Friday.

The award judges will reduce the competitive category lists to five on October 5th. The winners, who will each receive $ 10,000, will be announced on November 17 at a ceremony in Manhattan.

Four of the nominated poems are early works: “The Wild Fox of Yemen” by Threa Almontaser, “Ghost Letters” by Baba Badji, “What Noise Against the Cane” by Desiree C. Bailey and “The Sunflower Cast A Spell To Save Us From ”by Jackie Wang. The world. ”Others on the poetry list are“ Master Suffering ”by CM Burroughs,“ The Vault ”by Andrés Cerpa and“ Floaters ”by Martín Espada.

The non-fiction book features several works on the breed, including “All That She Carried” by Tiya Miles, “The Sum of Us” by Heather McGhee and “How the Word Is Passed” by Clint Smith. The other nominees are “Running Out” by Lucas Bessire, “Tastes Like War” by Grace M. Cho, “The Ground Breaking” by Scott Ellsworth, “Covered with Night” by Nicole Eustace and “The Black Civil War Soldier” by Deborah Willis.


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