The Conformist – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:28:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://i-racconti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png The Conformist – I Racconti http://i-racconti.com/ 32 32 The whirlwind life of a subversive art deco icon in ‘Lempicka’ at the Jolla Playhouse https://i-racconti.com/the-whirlwind-life-of-a-subversive-art-deco-icon-in-lempicka-at-the-jolla-playhouse/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 16:44:57 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-whirlwind-life-of-a-subversive-art-deco-icon-in-lempicka-at-the-jolla-playhouse/ The cast of “Lempicka” at La Jolla Playhouse. Photo by Matthew Murphy She lived a wild and tumultuous roller coaster life. Sometimes rich, sometimes poor. Both famous and forgotten. Art Deco artist, iconoclast and provocateur, tastemaker and pioneer, toast of Paris, New York and Hollywood, died in obscurity in Mexico, her ashes, at her request, […]]]>
Cast
The cast of “Lempicka” at La Jolla Playhouse. Photo by Matthew Murphy

She lived a wild and tumultuous roller coaster life. Sometimes rich, sometimes poor. Both famous and forgotten. Art Deco artist, iconoclast and provocateur, tastemaker and pioneer, toast of Paris, New York and Hollywood, died in obscurity in Mexico, her ashes, at her request, were thrown into the living volcano Popocatépetl.

And now, 42 years after her death, she rises again, like a phoenix, with a new musical bearing her name, and her paintings fetching tens of millions at high-end auction houses.

She was Tamara de Lempicka (1898-1980), born Tamara Rosalia Gurwik-Górska in Warsaw, Poland, to a wealthy Jewish lawyer and Russian socialite.

She met her aristocratic husband, Polish lawyer, Tadeusz Lempicki in St. Petersburg, Russia, and married him a year later when she was 18.

In 1917, when he is arrested by the secret police, she makes the ultimate sacrifice to get him out. They escaped the Russian Revolution and found themselves refugees in Paris. In 1939, as the Nazi invasion threatened, she, still aware of her Jewish heritage, feared for her life and fled to the United States.

Again and again she had to reinvent herself. “There is a certain freedom in losing everything,” she says. “Forget what came before.” “The century is different, so why shouldn’t I be? »

All of that (and more) makes its way into the new Broadway-bound musical, “Lempicka,” which premieres on the East Coast at the La Jolla Playhouse.

An earlier version of the play premiered in 2018 at the Williamstown Theater Festival in Massachusetts. This show was slated for its 2020 debut at the Playhouse, but Covid forced a change of plans.

So here we are with a much-revised incarnation of “Lempicka,” which, despite being conceived by playwright/lyricist Carson Kreitzer circa 2010, before she met composer and co-librettist Matt Gould, seems closely related to Ellis Avery’s landmark 2012 novel, “The Last Nude”. The book, set primarily in Paris in 1927, is narrated by 17-year-old runaway Rafaela Fano, who was Lempicka’s lover and muse.

Tony Award-winning director Rachel Chavkin, whose beautifully stylized work was last seen locally in 2016’s ‘The Royale’ at The Old Globe, and the recent touring production of ‘Hadestown’, are associated in the project since 2014.

Lempicka (Eden Espinosa, with a powerful voice, especially in her deep and rich alto range) was a maverick, a radical. Not the most devoted of wives or mothers, she led a decidedly hedonistic life, dating high rollers and engaging in multiple affairs, with men and women.

She began to paint seriously in Paris, to support the family when her husband did not seem to adapt (“What is a man without a homeland?” he laments). Her second husband was Baron Raoul Kuffner (local stalwart Victor E. Chan), a marriage that earned her the nickname “The Paintbrush Baroness”.

Although this musical offers a rough glimpse into the arc of her eventful life, it mostly focuses on the energy and delirium that was Jazz Age Paris in the 1920s, and the sexual emancipation of women who were born.

We see Rafaela sometimes prostitute and cabaret singer (beautiful Amber Iman, who brings a quiet grandeur to the frenetic piece, with her sensual presence and breathtaking voice. From July 12 to 24, Ximone Rose will take over the role). As Lempicka’s muse, lover and obsession, Rafaela is resented by Lempicka’s husband (Andrew Samonsky) and daughter Kizette (Jordan Tyson).

We hear a little about Lempicka’s art (“Line, color, form, shadow and light”, reminiscent of the 1985 Stephen Sondheim/James Lapine musical, “Sunday in the Park with George”). She looks at a person and sees a color: “cobalt, prussian blue, cerulean, sapphire… crimson, scarlet, vermilion, rose madder”. But we don’t see much of his art (rights issues?).

We meet Lempicka’s toughest teacher/critic/antagonist, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (George Abud), who tells him “We have to disturb, disturb the world”. The real Marinetti was the founder of the futurist movement, which decried the past and celebrated the modern, mechanical world. (He was also co-author of the Fascist Manifesto). He transforms into a Mussolini-loving blackshirt monster, reminding Lempicka of Hitler’s notion of “degenerate art” – “Jews and queers. You will be erased. The future is now and it’s mine. In the musical, he also shares Rafaela, much to Lempicka’s chagrin.

When she sees Marinetti starched and in uniform, Lempicka knows the party is over and she must leave Paris, where she had introduced Rafaela to a hidden speakeasy-like bar/cabaret, Le Monocle, whose motto is “Liberté , ‘Equality, Lesbianity.’ The (notorious) place is run by singer Suzy Solidor (Natalie Joy Johnson) who Lempicka also had an affair with, but not on this show.

We see how the artist struggles to be accepted in a man’s world; we briefly see his depression and attempted suicide.

But we never really get inside her head, or get a sense of what she’s really thinking and feeling. We are too caught up in the turbulence of the times and of production.

Chavkin is known for her multi-sensory sensibility, but she really outdid herself this time around, thanks to her design team and choreographer Raja Feather Kelly.

The intense focus on revolution, change, and the future is depicted in angular lines and rotating decor (Riccardo Hernandez), neon lights and flashing lights (Bradley King), and ever-changing projections (Peter Negrini ), both archival and artistic. It is a phantasmagoria of movement more than of art.

Even the sensuality is more suggested than shown. We see more Art Deco in the beautiful costumes (Anita Yavich) and production design than in Lempicka’s work – although the chilling cubist/neoclassical mix of her famous self-portrait, “Tamara in a Green Bugatti”, from 1929) dominates the set before the proceedings begin.

The score, excellently played by a 10-piece orchestra under the direction of Charity Wicks, echoes the general aesthetic: relentless energy, high volume, very pronounced belt (all this often making it difficult to discern the lyrics). The rock-infused metallic music is insistent and relentless, only toned down by Rafaela’s bluesy, scattered moments of welcome calm (“Stillness,” “Bracelet”).

There are stunning stage images and key pieces (“Love is for Fools”, “Woman Is”).

But with nearly three hours at a frenetic, feverish pace, the show could use more revision, condensing — and heart. And a lot more depth of character. Right now the room has the cold, hard surface of his paintings. It may be intentional, but it keeps us at an emotional distance.

This is a whirlwind tour of a subversive life, but it needs to breathe more and go deeper inside this driven maverick, a serial survivor who was keen to do things her own way, to to be seen and remembered.

Its prominent collectors include Madonna, Jack Nicholson and Barbra Streisand. Maybe now you’ll remember her too.



Pat Launer, a member of the American Theater Critics Association, is a longtime San Diego arts writer and Emmy Award-winning theater critic. An archive of his previews and reviews can be found at patlauner.com.

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My son is leaving | FlaglerLive https://i-racconti.com/my-son-is-leaving-flaglerlive/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:41:15 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/my-son-is-leaving-flaglerlive/ My children in front of “La Mort de Socrate” by Jacques Louis David (“La Mort de Socrate”, 1787), at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Painting played a central role in their upbringing. (© FlaglerLive) Today is the day. We are taking our son to UCF. There will be gloom. This day has been rushing […]]]>

My children in front of “La Mort de Socrate” by Jacques Louis David (“La Mort de Socrate”, 1787), at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Painting played a central role in their upbringing. (© FlaglerLive)

Today is the day. We are taking our son to UCF. There will be gloom. This day has been rushing towards us since it was born. It was once a distant meteor, invisible to the naked heart, but as sure as any astronomical certainty: its trajectory for a direct hit was also plotted on the day of its birth, as well as an equally precise day of impact. than that of college. move-in appointment day, until time: 3:30 p.m. at the Hercules dorm complex in our case, on that oddly mapped college campus in Homerphilia on the outskirts of Orlando.

tristan stoneIt’s Hercules, anyway. We’re just Mr. and Mrs. Prometheus, post-fire, ready for eternal torment.

Nothing you can do – nothing you have to do: being a parent also means preparing for the great extinction for 18 years, then submitting to the appointed day – and paying more. We are the dinosaurs. We need to be wiped out so our children can have their own Cambrian explosions. (Anachronistic, I know: the Cambrian came first, the Jurassic second. But get the hell out of here, why don’t you: dinosaurs aren’t known for brain capacity.)

The fact that we’ve been through an extinction before – with our daughter, who has since pounded us with many more vengeful meteors – doesn’t make matters any better. It certainly didn’t prepare us any more than the weird cancers we picked up along the way. It just eroded away more of the protective crust. We’re just older, more age-spotted, our immune systems as diminished as our illusions. We cover it all with b2 vitamins and are proud of our children’s past and hopefully future accomplishments.

Even as I write, my beloved, all-too-devout atheist son is at St. Thomas Episcopal glorifying the Sunday congregation with his violin, hours after sharing the stage with this decidedly non satanic tribute band to ELO in the auditorium, a few weeks away from refusing to parade with his promotion of the FPC, because that’s what he is, a non-conformist militant trying to escape from this prison of conformity.

He tried to hide his emancipation from us. It’s obvious he’s looking forward to it, even though he had bigger plans than UCF. He got into as many out-of-state colleges as he wanted, even in his nirvanah of New York. But we couldn’t pay. We dropped it. We’re in that donut income bracket, nowhere rich enough to pay more than in-state tuition, no longer poor enough to attract FASFC Mercy. And we don’t believe in graduating our children with the value of mortgage debt.

Luckily for our daughter, ten years ago our rudimentary tax filings could generate more substantial financial aid offers. It was what got him on the $60,000-a-year spree of his choosing (well, that and his best SAT scores). The ride took her 1,200 miles, then fairly well paid to push that 2,100 miles as she built her own family on top of her successes, every mile another kilotonne of blast zone for us, another acre of Eden for her: we could be Kuiper Belt garbage can 4 billion kilometers away for whatever interests him. But she’s fine, and soon we’ll be way beyond the Kuiper postcodes, so who cares? The eagle was not interested in the bloody history of Prometheus because it scratched his liver like a king.

My son and I haven’t had the benefits of a rocky relationship. We have not known a single day of war. Unusual for a couple of Lebanese blood, one more stubborn than the other, one more fiery than the other. At best, we had rare and forgettable skirmishes. But I knew the game was over when he first beat me at chess, around his eighth year, after I had beaten him about 900 times in a row, never drawing as much as a pawn. The only lesson I gave him in 18 years was, “get it.” He had. The rest was just counting down. This is how we have never been lenient with him, treating him as an equal in many ways from day one. It’s not like he won’t have to do the same with us when Cheryl and I return to diapers soon, although he has some work to do learning his resourcefulness. He can handle Sylvia Plath. I’m not sure he knows how to open a can of tuna. Obviously, he has his priorities straight.

luka
(© Pierre Tristan)

But proximity has a price. I was hoping that over the past few months we would get into the kind of fights that psychologists recognize (recommend?) as the natural antibody to impending separation, to lessen the shock that might come. We weren’t so lucky. I tried. I failed at that too. And Cheryl and I picked the worst time to cut triplets.

So it’s unforgiving when a day like today finally happens, and nothing like the closeness we’ve known for 18 years – 18 and a half years, reminded me of the little shit just six days ago – don’t will happen again. Of course, we’ll stay close, and as a lawyer friend recently reminded me (I need help pleading God’s indifference), these aren’t the good old days of smoke signals, postal mail and “long distance calls”, this phrase from not so long ago that billed households with terror. But the zillion-apped closeness isn’t the same, and we all know that. Remembering a concert, even replaying it, is not living it, and at 3:30 p.m. today the fat lady – excuse me, the tall one – will finally sing.

What will I do? I will do what Michael Lambert did when he said goodbye to his daughter in college. He and I had just come out of a sentencing hearing at the courthouse, where he had managed to minimize the punishment of an idiot, a very young ex-cop, in part by tapping into his own wisdom as a father. . We started talking about the ups and downs of life, the business of “but for the grace of God” that we forget or so easily replace with unpleasant self-pity, our luck and finally what men talk about older at dusk: our children. Then this formidable lawyer, one of the best in the area, this veteran of countless criminal trials who is represented far worse than the Raskolnikovs of our society, told me that all he could do was sob when he was saying goodbye to her child when he dropped her off.

I’m not really going to do that. That’s what I have has been do, and for almost as long as this meteor began to be visible on the wings of fleeting time. At 3:30 p.m. today, Luka, who has grown a bit since this column was taken many years ago, will no longer be hanging from my shoulder. Time is up.

Impact.

Pierre Tristam is the editor-in-chief of FlaglerLive.

luka tristan
(© A. J. Neste)

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Poet lamenting LOSS OF green paradise – The Sun Nigeria https://i-racconti.com/poet-lamenting-loss-of-green-paradise-the-sun-nigeria/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 23:36:44 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/poet-lamenting-loss-of-green-paradise-the-sun-nigeria/ By Henri Akubuiro A of Africa’s most famous and prolific poets, Professor Niyi Osundare made a triumphant entry into the Nigerian literary scene with a collection of poetry, market songs, in 1983. So far, he has published 21 volumes of poetry and won a number of literary and other prestigious awards, including the Commonwealth Poetry […]]]>

By Henri Akubuiro

A of Africa’s most famous and prolific poets, Professor Niyi Osundare made a triumphant entry into the Nigerian literary scene with a collection of poetry, market songs, in 1983. So far, he has published 21 volumes of poetry and won a number of literary and other prestigious awards, including the Commonwealth Poetry Prize, the Noma Award for Publishing in Africa and the ANA Poetry Prize. He was a recipient of the Fonlon/Nichols Award for “Excellence in Literary Creativity Combined with Significant Contributions to Human Rights in Africa”, Nigeria’s National Order of Merit Award, to name a few. only a few.

Over the years, Osundare’s poetry has maintained a fidelity to the cultural heritage of its original sociological base, particularly the Yoruba oral tradition, unfolding it as an intrinsic canvas to reach the world, as well as enriching his writings with a hybridity that appropriates foreign cultures. without conferring legitimacy.

Recently, Professor Niyi Osundare presented two new collections of poetry: Snapsongs – Home Moans and Stranger Flares and Green: Sighs of a sick planet —to the bibliophiles of Lagos. The two collections of poetry, published by University Press, Ibadan, and Black Widow Press, Boston (2021), testify to Osundare’s relentless quest to save the earth. Kneeling before the altar of reason in his bardic mission, the poet refuses to be deceived by the scheme of banal things. Carefully he makes a swift ferret for those ennobling things of nature – of green and blue – which build up the universe. For Osundare, the universe is the local and the local is the universe. Collecting one is a stepping stone to saving every creation and rewrite desperate history.

A social critic, Osundare is like anopheles to the ears of bad leaders and non-state actors. The odiousness of corruption, mismanagement and the growing chasm between rich and poor do not excite him as a humanist; therefore, he mourns the death of innocence, the colors of the societal sepulchre, ridicule the sad state of the planet.

Snapsongs: Homegroans and Foreignflares

So far, many poems in Snapsongs… (2021) have been published in different media outfits around the world, but they are united by similar motifs across its four sections. While the majority of them are nature poems, others are interspersed with social critiques, with ever-changing past chronicling perspectives, as well as a detailed examination of the power game as it affects the world.

Also, most poems in Snapsongs are quatrains. There are no deliberate rhymes in this collection, but many poems show enhanced prosody with a fertile imagination. Obviously, music meets poetry when an Osundare is involved. He is a crooner whose idioms are introspective, from the epigrammatic to the parabolic.

Osundare appears as a seller of words, and m words have consequences, as the poet peddles his wares through the streets of absent ears. Some of the poems in this collection contain anachronistic words of wisdom, formulated in traditional idioms. Frankly, some verses read like pastiches of an old baba. Take for example, in “Set the Night on Fire”, you will learn age-old truths: the butterfly cannot count the dazzling colors of its dress: the centipede glides on legs that move by millions of magic. In “The River Sleeps in Its Bed”, the truths echo that if you quarrel with the moon, you must learn to face the devil of darkness. And don’t forget that the mystical cloak of night hides a cache of rattling knives.

Osundare is not a conformist. In “If Eden Were So Benign”, he poses some tough questions that demand answers. These are declamations that do not lend themselves to jejun but rather interrogate things we take for granted about existence and religion. The Bible tells us that the Garden of Eden was a wonderful place, but Osundare is confused as to how the Serpent was smuggled into this idyllic place, thus: “…What was the Serpent doing on his tree/D’ where did he get his venom/Who was the Gardener/… Who gave Satan so much power//Who planted this Tree with the Forbidden Fruit? (page 11)

The inquisitive voice seeks to know in what strange language the Serpent cajoled his audience (Adam and Eve) and what primal electricity to be fed the glow of Original Sin. He continues this search for answers in “There’s a God in Every Man” when the speaker of the poem asks who told you that God is a man. It boggles our minds that the bearded, white-faced patriarch in the books is nothing but the figment of the imagination of a wild and biased imagination. Maybe heaven is also overcrowded with wishful thinking. However, it would be wrong to call this a nihilistic resignation.

In this bardic project, Osundare projects a better understanding of life and its hidden meanings. Life is an enigma, needless to say, and what isn’t said is often stronger than what is said. When you pray, do you channel your prayers to a God with a year-old beard or clean-shaven like a millennial monk? The poet dwells on the truth we fear, the only straight line on the horizon, the thousand lessons of the valley, etc.

In the Homegroans section, the bard speaks of a “wonderland”, a land of miracles where anomalies reign supreme, with the authorities mortgaging the future of the dystopian African country by always thinking of number one. The voice in this section is incisive, constantly calling on them to provide darkness instead of light, to sink the nation under water, and to be delinquent defectors across party lines. ‘O to Gee’ is the anthem of rebellion against the Senate king in a recent political debate dispenses in Nigeria. There are scenes from a Nigerian political circus, while the cantos of “Juin 12 and Its Children” recall a tearful political past woven by a political Maradona. This section is full of political satire.

From foreign rockets to parables of power, the cultural overlaps of Osundare manifest in the verses, with a watchful eye on racial issues and socio-political convulsions elsewhere. When you read, towards the end, “Parable of the fingers”, based on the palaver of the nuclear red button, one distills that it is no longer paranoid to think that the apocalypse can be triggered at any moment by non- conformists against our will.

Green: the sighs of our sick planet

The second volume of poetry, Green: Sighs of our sick planet, is a volume of poetry woven around ecocentrism. Osundare’s environmental concerns are taken a notch higher here. From cover to content, the poet’s ecological sensitivity and awareness of his rape reaches a steady peak. It is undoubtedly a fascinating offer for students of ecocriticism.

Structured in nine uneven sections, Osundare paints disturbing images of our dying planet, the culprits, in most cases, being man and his industrialization, actions and inactions. Osundare also recognizes some important artists and ideologues who made interventions in nature decades ago serenading us with enchanting verses about the beauty of their world/our world, but which have turned into mere whims today. today.

In Green: Sighs of our sick planet, the poet launches a plaintive cry to save the planet, praising the beautiful seasons around the world. The poet immerses himself in these seasons, making himself an eco-hero above common point.

“Hole in the Sky” tells us about the degradation of the ozone layer caused by the greenhouse effect of factories and automobiles thus creating a domino effect which has had an impact on all living beings on the planet and inanimate things. It is a “flaming and blinding hole / In the garment of heaven” (p. 10). Many years ago, humanity sowed the wind. Now “The Tourbillon is ripe for our carefree harvest” (p. 29). It is a climate of fear, a simulated mountain and a dying lake.

Osundare laments a fallen tree and the Amazon fire. He is displeased with a forest of faded glories, with shrunken roots in the heat-harassed earthly crypt, amid withered leaves fluttering in the wind.

Osundare remembers environmentalist and writer, Ken Saro-Wiwa, who fought and died to save the environment in his Niger Delta. Unfortunately, today, “the door of the Delta trembles in its weak frame” (p. 51). There are other references to Gabriel Okara and his aquatic poems which, juxtaposed with today’s reality, would blur the lines.

In the sixth section, Osundare serenades the fruits and food we eat, garden and harvest. In the next, he celebrates the seasons, from West Africa’s dry season to the Western world’s autumn. In the eighth section, the poet renders aquatic verse, while he sings of life beyond the geography of pain in the final part.

It is a consummate work that enlists Osundare among the world’s finest nature poets who include, among others, Robert Frost, William Wordsworth, John Keats, William Blake, Alfred Tennison, who sang of the wind, divined in the sky, embracing it, and making the moon appear on simple plates. Osundare Green…is an indirect attack on humanity and its hostile relationship with nature. Isn’t the man mortified? Osundare poetizes for redemption.

]]> Reviews | If I’m cancelled, I want friends, not allies https://i-racconti.com/reviews-if-im-cancelled-i-want-friends-not-allies/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 09:00:09 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/reviews-if-im-cancelled-i-want-friends-not-allies/ The most important thing about not fighting cancellation is not recruiting friends to my cause. The expectation that friends will show “courage” to speak up on their behalf, the tendency to see cancellation as a test of friendship, which suddenly demands proof of loyalty – this is the first step on the way from the […]]]>

The most important thing about not fighting cancellation is not recruiting friends to my cause. The expectation that friends will show “courage” to speak up on their behalf, the tendency to see cancellation as a test of friendship, which suddenly demands proof of loyalty – this is the first step on the way from the purge of friends. Here’s how it goes: a few of the canceled person’s friends respond to the expectation to speak up, but those who remain silent – which is most of them – become suspicious. New publicly aligned friends are acquired to take their place. The beleaguered nullified now feels they see who their “true friends” are, but in fact, they no longer have any friends. She only has allies. First she turned her friends, and maybe even family members, into allies; then she acquired more allies to fill the ranks of purged friends. The end result is a united front, but what I would call true friendship has disappeared from the marketplace.

I don’t want any of this. I want friends who feel free to disagree with me publicly and privately; friends who will admonish me, gently but firmly, with all the truth in the charges against me. I want friends whose minds are not bound to mine by ties of allegiance, but turn freely of their own accord. I like my annoying friends, and the way their thoughts trace wonderful and mysterious paths, following a logic of their own; and I cherish my conformist friends, who keep me informed of the wisdom of most people. I want friends who ask the right questions, friends who bring me cookies, friends who help me when I stumble, friends who devote so much attention to my interior that they have little to devote to how which I am perceived by others. I want friends, not allies. I value my public persona, but not enough to sacrifice the freedom of my friendships at its altar.

What if, when the time comes, I come to see it all differently? Isn’t there a chance that when I’m in the thick of it, I want “my” people to rally around me, defend me, call out my accusers, be willing to risk their own reputations in my name, to show the world that I am equipped with a team of supporters ready to fight by my side? Yes of course.

My brief entanglement with the crowd has taught me that it’s not when I’m most beleaguered that I see most clearly. This is why, like Ulysses, I attach myself in advance to the mast. I pledge now, publicly, in writing: please do not fight on my behalf. Don’t defend me. Don’t save my good name. May it be tarnished. Let my reputation die.

Agnes Callard is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago.

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Legendary French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant dies aged 91 https://i-racconti.com/legendary-french-actor-jean-louis-trintignant-dies-aged-91/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 20:47:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/legendary-french-actor-jean-louis-trintignant-dies-aged-91/ NNA | Updated: June 19, 2022 2:17 a.m. STI Washington [US]June 19 (ANI): Jean-Louis Trintignant, the César actor and star of French classics like “Amour”, “Z” and “Le Conformiste”, died at the age of 91.According to Deadline, the legendary actor, also known for ‘Three Colors: Red’ and ‘A Man and a Woman’, died Friday at […]]]>



NNA |
Updated:
June 19, 2022 2:17 a.m. STI

Washington [US]June 19 (ANI): Jean-Louis Trintignant, the César actor and star of French classics like “Amour”, “Z” and “Le Conformiste”, died at the age of 91.
According to Deadline, the legendary actor, also known for ‘Three Colors: Red’ and ‘A Man and a Woman’, died Friday at his home in the south of France.
Trintignant rose to prominence in 1966, playing alongside Anouk Aimee in the double Oscar-winning “A Man and a Woman” (1966), which won the Oscars for Best Screenplay and Best Foreign Language Film. In 2019, he interpreted his last role in retaliation for the character.
He went on to appear in over 130 films and acted in numerous plays throughout his long career. He has won the César for “best actor” three times; for Three Colors: Red, Fiesta and Love. His last victory was in 2013. He also won the “best actor” award at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival for the political thriller “Z”.

Known for avoiding the public limelight, he has always remained focused on his craft during his time in the limelight and is widely recognized as one of France’s greatest actors, according to Deadline.
According to The Hollywood Reporter, in one of his last interviews, he reflected on his craft.
“I was extremely shy. And I wasn’t interested in being famous. You know, it’s fun the first time, then not at all. Why are they giving us awards? giving Oscars to people who do jobs which are not fun at all,” he said.
Her personal life was struck by tragedy, devastatingly losing two daughters. One of her daughters was murdered by rock star Bertrand Cantat in 2003, while the other child, Pauline, died aged nine months.
He is now survived by his son Vincent and his wife Marianne. (ANI)

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The best Italian films of all time https://i-racconti.com/the-best-italian-films-of-all-time/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 14:18:12 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/the-best-italian-films-of-all-time/ Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images The best Italian films of all time Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg in “La Dolce Vita” Cinecittà #25. ‘Big Deal on Madonna Street’ (1958) Marcello Mastroianni, Vittorio Gassman and others converse in a scene from ‘Big Deal on Madonna Street’ Movie March #24. “The Conformist” (1970) Two women dance in […]]]>

Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images

The best Italian films of all time

Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg in “La Dolce Vita”



Cinecittà

#25. ‘Big Deal on Madonna Street’ (1958)

Marcello Mastroianni, Vittorio Gassman and others converse in a scene from ‘Big Deal on Madonna Street’



Movie March

#24. “The Conformist” (1970)

Two women dance in a scene from “The Conformist”



FC Produzioni

#23. ‘Amarcord’ (1973)

Two actresses in a scene from ‘Amarcord’



Dismantle it

#22. “We All Loved Each Other So Much” (1974)

Nino Manfredi and Stefania Sandrelli talk in a scene from ‘We All Loved Each Other So Much’



RPA Cinematografica

#21. ‘Amici miei’ (1975)

Gesture of the actors in a scene from ‘Amici miei’



Alfa Cinematografica Cooperative Society

#20. ‘Shoe Wax’ (1946)

Franco Interlenghi and Rinaldo Smordoni in a scene from ‘Shoeshine’



Vera Films Spa

#19. “Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion” (1970)

Florida Bolkan with her arms raised in a scene from ‘Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion’



Titanus

#18. ‘Italian Divorce’ (1961)

Marcello Mastroianni and Daniela Rocca in a scene from ‘Divorce Italian Style’



Movie Nepi

#17. ‘The Notte’ (1961)

Marcello Mastroianni, Jeanne Moreau and Monica Vitti in a scene from ‘La Notte’



20th century fox

#16. “The Leopard” (1963)

Actors in a scene from “The Leopard”



Excelsa Film

#15. “Rome, open city” (1945)

Anna Magnani and the cast of a scene from “Rome, Open City”



Pointi-De Laurentiis Cinematografica

#14. “The Road” (1954)

Giulietta Masina in a scene from ‘The Road’



sciarlo

#13. ‘The Legend of 1900’ (1998)

Tim Roth at the piano in a scene from ‘The Legend of 1900’



Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images

#12. “The Sweet Life” (1960)

Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg in “La Dolce Vita”



Cineriz

#11. ‘8½’ (1963)

Marcello Mastroianni, Anouk Aimee and actors in a scene from ‘8 1/2’



Dino by Laurentiis Cinematografica

#ten. “The Great War” (1959)

Vittorio Gassman and Silvana Mangano in a scene from “The Great War”



Champion Compangnia Cinematografica

#9. “A Special Day” (1977)

Marcello Mastroianni and Sofia Loren in a scene from “A Special Day”



Rialto Pictures

#8. ‘Cabiria Nights’ (1957)

Giulietta Masina in a scene from ‘Nights of Cabiria’



Incei Film

#seven. “Il Sorpasso” (1962)

Vittorio Gassman and Jean-Louis Trintignant in “Il Sorpasso”



Titanus

#6. “Rocco and his brothers” (1960)

Alain Delon in a scene from “Rocco and his brothers”



Movie Rizzoli

#5. ‘Umberto D.’ (1952)

Carlo Battisti with a dog in ‘Umberto D’



Sica Productions (PDS)

#4. “Bicycle Thieves” (1948)

Lamberto Maggiorani and Enzo Staiola in a scene from ‘Bicycle Thieves’



Bi Bi Movie

#3. “The Best of Youth” (2003)

Jasmine Trinca in a scene from “The Best of Youth”



Miramax

#2. ‘Cinema Paradiso’ (1988)

Salvatore Cascio and Philippe Noiret in a scene from ‘Cinema Paradiso’



Melampo Cinematografica

#1. “Life is Beautiful” (1997)

Roberto Benigni, Nicoletta Braschi and Giorgio Cantarini in “Life in Beauty”


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Penelope Cruz and Antonio Banderas devour the art-house in the frenetically funny “official competition” https://i-racconti.com/penelope-cruz-and-antonio-banderas-devour-the-art-house-in-the-frenetically-funny-official-competition/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:01:13 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/penelope-cruz-and-antonio-banderas-devour-the-art-house-in-the-frenetically-funny-official-competition/ If there’s a common denominator as to what plagues serious low-budget filmmakers, it seems to be the subject of resources – there’s never enough money, there’s never enough time, and they’re still chasing those two things like a cartoon character chasing the lit fuse on a stick of dynamite. So what would happen if these […]]]>
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If there’s a common denominator as to what plagues serious low-budget filmmakers, it seems to be the subject of resources – there’s never enough money, there’s never enough time, and they’re still chasing those two things like a cartoon character chasing the lit fuse on a stick of dynamite. So what would happen if these two problems were here, erased like so much nothingness? For example, what if an angel investor in the form of an artless billionaire at the end of his life suddenly decided to pour in unlimited funding with the prospect of leaving behind something vaguely significant – something under the form of a film? It’s the delightfully sneering proposition at the heart of Official competitionArgentinian director Mariano Cohn and Gastón Duprat’s scathingly funny satire on the international arthouse scene – think of it as The place for filmmakers, but only if you immediately sink into the ribs for calling something,”The place for filmmakers.

Humberto Suárez (José Luis Gómez), the artless billionaire in question, first thinks of building a bridge on which to inscribe his name, speaking heritage. But a second later, without any rhyme, he decides no, it should be a movie instead! Humberto doesn’t seem to know anything about movies, or care about anything about movies – you might be able to see the flashes of celebrity adulation flash in his eyes as he stares into space at this moment – there, if you squint hard enough, but it might as well be gas.

Either way, freshly thrilled by his sudden impulse, Humberto demands that his personal assistant find only “the best” – find him the “best” director, find him the “best” most serious story. Just find him the best of everything, whatever that means. If his personal assistant had been a huge Adam Sandler fan, we’d be in for a very different movie! But no, her first thought goes to forward-thinking director Lola Cuevas (a never-so-funny Penelope Cruz), whose previous credits include the perfect-sounding movie trilogy titled Haze, The voidand my favorite reverse rain. Still, it’s not too surprising that this woman leaves a memorable mark once we see what a huge shadow she casts in any room, and I’m not just talking about hair. But we should probably start with this hair – fiery red curls stacked like the mane of a lion that gets too close to an electrified fence, this hair seems to get bigger from scene to scene; by the end of the movie, she’s almost a sentient wig with legs. A fashionable Cousin It for the Volpi Cup set. It’s really the gag that keeps on giving.

Director completed and purchased, Humberto & Co. then shelled out another heap of cash for the rights to a Nobel Prize-winning book that no one but Lola herself appears to have read, although Cliff’s version Notes on the Rival Brothers she quickly sums up is so hilariously indifferent to the details that we wonder if she’s read it either. Lola’s fascination seems more geared towards the casting thing she has in mind for the brothers at the center of the story – she wants them to be played by two equal but opposing cultural forces. Spare no expense! One will be played by an international movie star named Félix Rivero, who is in Official competition played by international movie star Antonio Banderas, having fun skewering his own wayward Hollywood stabs and no doubt many of the big movie stars he’s met along the way. And the other brother will be played by a hugely respected serious comedian named Iván Torres, who in turn is played by serious real-life comedian Oscar Martínez. Coincidentally, Martínez won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor in Venice for the 2016 film titled The Distinguished Citizen, which was whaddya-know also directed by these same directors here. This is a movie that loves its self-referential hits! This is Cry 3 for the filmmaker set! (Okay, I’ll stop saying “filmmaker” now.)

Thus the war between Art and Commerce wins its figureheads, and from there Official competition holds nothing back from his relentless mockery of the huge peacock egos on every end. Lola demands a long rehearsal period, and Humberto gives the trio an unfettered run from a hilariously huge Gehry-esque convention center to do it. Reminiscent of the pristine architectural spaces of Bertolucci The conformist– only scalped of any sense of history, time, place and meaning – we then watch Lola, Félix and Iván attempt to strive for the intimacy necessary to make this brotherly bond seem authentic, while shouting at each other opposite ends of an aircraft hangar. Infinite resources quickly become a wacky abyss from which no real art can escape. A quicksand resembling a silver pit of anything becomes an endless possibility, it in turn seems impossible that a movie could ever arise from these ridiculous circumstances. And that’s before Lola even pulls out the shredder.

Indeed, the absurd intimacy of the filmmaking process seems the truest and fiercest target of Cohn and Duprat’s goal – that anything ever come out of tossing stacks of emotionally stunted narcissists and egocentrics into heavy eye-sockets of each other for several weeks and then asking them to reveal their innermost selves in the name of cinematic immortality is itself a peculiar kind of outrageous but age-old buffoonery. The one that sometimes bears fruit, but which ends up even more often in disaster. Contentious, emotional and violent gibberish disaster. And given the whole world to play with, it seems reasonable that, like an insult uttered through a twisty vacuum tube, that shit would eventually come back only to bite our ass off. Fortunately Official competition makes it all a seditious snack.


The Falklands Malvinas War: 40 years of a war that meant nothing and meant everything | “What is a food that you hate not because of the taste but because of the texture?”

Image sources (in order of publication): IFC Films,

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LIV Golf has reason to feel good about itself, but where does the sport go from here? | Golf News and Tour Information https://i-racconti.com/liv-golf-has-reason-to-feel-good-about-itself-but-where-does-the-sport-go-from-here-golf-news-and-tour-information/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 13:02:25 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/liv-golf-has-reason-to-feel-good-about-itself-but-where-does-the-sport-go-from-here-golf-news-and-tour-information/ Yasir bin Othman Al-Rumayyan, a senior Saudi government official, pressed the flesh during the glitzy trophy ceremony. It was the Saudis and their vast reserves of oil money that started LIV. Al-Rumayyan’s preppy Western attire and impeccable manners did not hint at the atrocities his government has repeatedly committed. LIV frontman Greg Norman acted as […]]]>
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SNP education secretary defends reforms despite fear of impact from civil servants https://i-racconti.com/snp-education-secretary-defends-reforms-despite-fear-of-impact-from-civil-servants/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/snp-education-secretary-defends-reforms-despite-fear-of-impact-from-civil-servants/ The Education Secretary has said she will personally ensure that her reform plans lead to meaningful improvement amid fears they could be stifled by civil servants and bureaucrats. Shirley-Anne Somerville made the remarks after her speech at the Annual General Meeting of the Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS) in Dundee. She told the Herald: “I […]]]>

The Education Secretary has said she will personally ensure that her reform plans lead to meaningful improvement amid fears they could be stifled by civil servants and bureaucrats.

Shirley-Anne Somerville made the remarks after her speech at the Annual General Meeting of the Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS) in Dundee.

She told the Herald: “I am determined to bring about change. I think I’m used to showing in social security that I can take a system that was very unpopular and turn it into a system that’s now trusted, and that’s what I’m determined to do. also in the field of education.

His comments follow confirmation in March that the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) and standards body Education Scotland are to be replaced. A totally independent academic inspection will also be created. The announcement coincided with the publication of a major report on the education system by Professor Ken Muir, former chief executive of the General Teaching Council for Scotland.

However, earlier this week Professor Walter Humes, one of Scotland’s top education experts, argued in an op-ed for this newspaper that the reforms risked being hijacked by civil servants who resist innovation. He added, “I understand that a strategic reform program council, with several subordinate councils, has been established. These are populated by the usual suspects – senior civil servants, directors of education, representatives of the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) and staff of bodies who need to be replaced.

“It looks like insider trading, with those who are part of the problem tasked with producing solutions. decidedly distant.

Prof Humes, also a member of the expert panel which supported Prof Muir in producing his report, claimed Scottish education had been damaged by a ‘conformist culture’ which sees ‘too many people of modest talent to be promoted to leadership positions”. He wrote that these individuals then proceed to “defend their turf, marginalize talented colleagues, and resist new ideas.”

He added, “The system desperately needs creative people who are mindful of the massive changes education is facing due to technological advancements, geopolitical pressures and economic challenges. By delegating the reform agenda to the usual players, the cabinet secretary runs the risk of repeating the mistakes of her predecessors. Scottish education desperately needs new thinkers and new voices.

Ms Somerville said: ‘What I would say to Walter and other concerned people is that this reform process is being led by a cabinet secretary who came very early in her term in government and said that we would see significant changes. I will oversee this reform process to ensure that we get these important changes out of it. She also insisted that a “national discussion” on Scottish education would explore different ways of involving everyone with an interest.

Ms Somerville told delegates during her speech on HIA that ministers would work ‘with teachers and other stakeholders to plan the national discussion to ensure it includes all of these interests’. She added: “As part of this, I look forward to working with all of you as we develop this discussion and our broader reform agenda. I know you will be keen to understand how and when this will happen, and I will do so before the end of the term.

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Life after the band – how a former punk band guitarist became a fair trade barista https://i-racconti.com/life-after-the-band-how-a-former-punk-band-guitarist-became-a-fair-trade-barista/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:30:44 +0000 https://i-racconti.com/life-after-the-band-how-a-former-punk-band-guitarist-became-a-fair-trade-barista/ The story of a guy who decided to stick with the man with coffee beans rather than punk music. Our Japanese-speaking journalist Seiji Nakazawa strongly believes in the mantra’we only live once‘, where you live life to the fullest and make the most of every opportunity. He started to feel this from his teenage years, […]]]>

The story of a guy who decided to stick with the man with coffee beans rather than punk music.

Our Japanese-speaking journalist Seiji Nakazawa strongly believes in the mantra’we only live once‘, where you live life to the fullest and make the most of every opportunity. He started to feel this from his teenage years, when he picked up a guitar and started playing with a band. Although he’s now a full-time writer at SoraNews24, that doesn’t mean his dream of becoming a professional musician never came to fruition. quite the contrary, in fact, because he has given concerts all over the world, and has even written and released his own record.

And though Seiji managed to continue living a humble life after reaching the dizzying heights of global rockstar fame, he always wondered what happened to other musicians once their time in the spotlight was over, especially in the case of bands.

Putting on his investigative reporter glasses, Seiji tracked down one such person; a man called NGformer guitarist in a Tokyo punk band roba (‘Donkey’).

▼ The group was active in the Shibuya, Koenji and Shimokitazawa areas of Tokyo between 2011 and 2016.

After initially signing with Japanese indie label GoodLovin’Production, Roba went on to create his own label, touring live house tours all over Japan.

▼ One of Roba’s hits, “Early Afternoon”.

Even the group photo has an underground, electric vibe that made Seiji a little nervous about meeting a real punk rocker. This guy was surely going to be quite intimidating…!

▼…or so Seiji thought, because it’s NG today.

These days, NG is the Managing Director and Director of SOIL COFFEE, a home-roasted coffee shop with three stores in Tokyo and another in Fukui Prefecture. He also bears his real name, Mr. Nakajima. There’s no way anyone could tell he was once a punk band guitarist, and so Seiji decided to ask him about his punk band’s history.

Seji: How did you start playing in a band?

Mr. Nakajima: In my third year of middle school, I came across Shigeo Hamada, a third-generation fish farmer who wrote the preface to the liner notes for the Rolling Stones album Stripped. Inspired by him, I decided to start writing lyrics myself. I learned the guitar to accompany my lyrics. Then, once in high school, I heard another student playing “Born To Be Wild” by Steppenwolf which touched me, and I started playing in a band.

From there, we started getting paid to play in cafes and hotels, and that’s when I met the other Roba members. At the time, I played more blues, but I thought the “DIY spirit” of the other members was really cool. I remember recording Roba’s first demo in a lab at Tama Art University. Everything was so awesome. I really wanted more than anything to make a living as a musician.

A few years later, Mr. Nakajima graduated from college and started working at a live house in Kichijoji called “Force Floor”. He was playing music every day, and he had finally become a fully professional musician. That’s when Roba started to break down.

Mr. Nakajima: The ideals and reality of each member intertwine, like an unstoppable flow. It was a huge factor in Roba’s breakup, that’s for sure. Around the same time, my other band ‘zampano’ also went on hiatus. I’m not sure of the exact reason, but our lead singer left the band due to the stress of the tight touring schedule. We looked for a new lead singer and found one, but after about two shows, They are dead.

To be fair, my memory at that time is so fuzzy that I’m not even sure it’s true. All I knew was that I couldn’t go on like this.

Suddenly, Mr. Nakajima’s two bands were over, and the life as a professional musician he had worked so hard for was also over. It was at this time that he met Rieko Arai, the president of SOL’S COFFEE and his current wife.

So what happened next?

Mr. Nakajima: After losing my two groups, I decided that I wanted create a music label.

Seji: Like a company that distributes CDs?

Mr. Nakajima: More like the one who makes the CDs. I had recording equipment and luckily I had the experience of starting an independent label when I was in Roba. I thought it would be a great opportunity to promote music that I thought was great. So I asked Reiko, and she was like “Why don’t you buy a CD press?” When I heard that, my jaw hit the ground.

Seji: How come?

Mr. Nakajima: Well, I had just assumed that I should have the CDs pressed at another company, based on the know-how I acquired as a member of the band. I never thought of buying a CD press and pressing them myself. Kind of like a coffee that has its own roast; you can establish your brand much better this way. SOL’S COFFEE is created entirely by us, the workers – the walls, the floors, the bread and the pastries. Everything here was much more DIY, independent and original than my ideal independent label. “Cafes are so punkI thought. This piqued my curiosity and I thought I would like to start working here instead.

Mr. Nakajima: And since I’ve been working here, my eyes have opened up a lot. There’s a move called ‘specialty coffee‘ which basically works as a counter move to all those big coffee chains. In the past, it was common to buy a blend of coffee beans from different regions or countries in bulk at a low price and sell the coffee with a low profit margin.

But it was not fair to the coffee farmers, who suffered more and more. Therefore, we decided to pay a fair price for good coffee beans. This way we can improve the quality of the coffee we serve, while giving money back to farmers and increasing the value of the coffee itself.

Seji: How punk! Like when rock band Nirvana came out in the heyday of MTV and turned everything upside down.

Mr. Nakajima: Yes! This movement is very ‘Smells like Teen Spirit’, isn’t it? In fact, when I looked into it, I found that a lot of people from the punk culture were into the specialty coffee movement. I felt like there was a real connection between punk culture and specialty coffee — both are very “mavericks”.

Seji: So you’re saying that the ‘spirit’ of the store hasn’t changed?

Mr. Nakajima: Well, we’re just a cafe, but the punk spirit is still very present. In fact, when I was invited to a cafe in Taiwan, I also played guitar, although I wasn’t specifically asked to, haha.

We have also collaborated with the UNIQLO Asakusa store to make “SOL’S COFFEE” T-shirts, using the same design as the bags our coffee comes in. A portion of the profits will be donated to the coffee farmers who made the original jute bags. We wanted the people who came to buy the t-shirts to think about how far coffee has come, all the way to the farmers who grow the beans. Personally, I think it’s interesting that we were able to use the influence of a large corporation to spread the word about these little cafes. I think those ideas came from being in a punk band.

▼ The t-shirts available at UNIQLO…

▼ … display the logo present on the jute coffee bags.

While Mr. Nakajima happily lives his life as a barista, he still wants music to be a big part of his life. His current dream is to record music made by coffee bean farm workers, play their music in stores, and donate all profits from resold CDs to the workers.

And when Seiji asked if he was glad he was in a band, Mr. Nakajima replied, “I have very precious memories of my time playing in a band, including Roba. I am the person I am today thanks to my life as a member of the group.

So if you’re craving coffee with an interesting story, head to SOIL COFFEE.

Coffee information
SOL’S COFFEE ROASTING
東京都台東区浅草橋3丁目25−7 NIビル1F
NI Building, 3-chōme−25−7, Asakusabashi, Taito City, Tokyo
Opening hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Closed on Wednesday

Photos ©SoraNews24
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